pullets in a chickentractor in October

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by kimslack, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. kimslack

    kimslack Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Western NY
    I have 9 pullets and 1 cockerel living in my chicken tractor. I was given them as chicks and range in age from 9 weeks to 17 weeks. There are hawks migrating right now and I want to give them chicken grower feed so I'm trying to keep them in the tractor as long as possible. But the nights are getting colder. The nights have been dropping down a few times into the low 30's. I have a tarp over the sides and then I wrap it in two plastic tarps at night to keep the wind out. I put old fence posts inside for them to perch on. This friday will be 30 degrees with showers at night. But for the most part, its been mild enough...just damp as fall usually is.

    Does anyone know how long young chickens can stay in a chicken tractor in Western NY?


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  2. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Colmesneil,TX
    Keep moving it, every day if you can, and keep one end closed up and they can stay in it as long as they need to. Make sure the open end isn't facing the wind. Most hawks in my area wont' mess with them once they get up to around 4 lbs.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2012
  3. kimslack

    kimslack Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Western NY
    I put the tarps over both ends. One of the tarps is shredded a bit so it has alot of air holes but holds together enough to keep the wind out. I've been moving it each day.

    As a new chicken flock owner, I feel bad that they can't go into the snug coop with the layers but I think its better health wise if they stay where they can get grower feed and protected from the red tails.
     
  4. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Aug 20, 2010
    Colmesneil,TX
    You are right about staying there. However when I said to cover just one end, I meant 24/7. That thing would become a wind tunnel in winter if the wind changed a bit and get really cold. Open on the end opposite the wind is much better. No moist air buildup and they will still be cozy at night.
     
  5. chickenlover89

    chickenlover89 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2012
    they will do just fine in the cold, as long as they are protected from wind.
     
  6. kimslack

    kimslack Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Western NY
    Yeah.. I've experienced the same thing when camping and sleeping in a van. I'll open it more on one end so it will vent better. Thanks.
     

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