Puppy very lethargic

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by perfectly_polish, Jun 23, 2008.

  1. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    We have an 8 month old American Staffordshire Terrier puppy that we've had since she was 8 weeks old. The past few days, she's been very lethargic. She won't eat, drink, or move and her back legs are stiff. She normally downs her food in a couple of minutes, but now she won't touch it. We took her to the vet today, they took a whole bunch of tests, which as came up negative, did xrays, and put water in her back because she was dehydrated, they didn't find anything wrong with her, so we spent $400 to find out nothing is wrong with our dog [​IMG] She has all her shots, and was perfectly healthy and happy up until a couple days ago. She eats everything and anything, so we thought she might have gotten something clogged in her stomach, but the vet said the xrays would have showed it. Anybody have any ideas what's going on with her?
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2008
  2. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

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    She knows you're getting another puppy!
     
  3. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:LOL, she is very happy about her little brother. I was playing the puppy video and all 3 of my dogs heard them whinning and ran up to the computer [​IMG]
     
  4. bionic_chicken

    bionic_chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sorry. I don't know what is wrong exactly, but I do know that pups can easily experience low blood sugar. I really suggest giving the pup Karo syrup. You can even rub it on the gums with your finger. This will raise the blood sugar and break the lethargy. You may have to do this a couple of times a day for a few days. After you give the pup the Karo, definitely administer some fluids with electrolytes like Pedialyte or Gatorade. Give it with a syringe, slowly. Then fresh water. You might also buy the Puppy Milk Replacer that you can easily get at Petco or Petsmart, even some grocery stores. Offer it alone at first to get the pup going, then mix it with wet puppy food. I hope the puppy perks up ASAP! My thoughts and prayers are with you! [​IMG]
     
  5. lorieMN

    lorieMN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    she may have just pulled some muscles or tweeked her back some..you could ask the vet for remidal (sp),if its one of those things that would help..
     
  6. HatTrickSilkies

    HatTrickSilkies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 6, 2007
    Eastern PA
    Did your vet discuss the possibility (or rule out the possibility) of Panosteitis ?
     
  7. Jaybr

    Jaybr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 1, 2008
    Matoaca, VA
    Does the dog have any ticks on it?

    Kinda sounds like Tick Paralysis
     
  8. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:She does get ticks once and a while, but had none when we were at the vet. Is tick paralysis the same thing as lyme disease? They tested her for lyme disease but it came back as negative.
     
  9. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:No, he never said anything about that.
     
  10. Jaybr

    Jaybr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:She does get ticks once and a while, but had none when we were at the vet. Is tick paralysis the same thing as lyme disease? They tested her for lyme disease but it came back as negative.

    No it's not the same, but if she has no ticks, or has had none in the past couple days it's probably not Tick paralysis

    http://www.petside.com/portal/site/...00075c1d240RCRD&ConditionName=Tick Paralysis

    Tick Paralysis (Canine)

    Toxicity occurs when a female tick injects a neurotoxin through her saliva into the host. The toxin prevents the signal from nerves from reaching muscles, resulting in flaccid paresis (hindlimb weakness) and eventual paralysis.



    Clinical signs are seen 5-9 days after tick attachment, and progress from paresis to quadriplegia within 24-72 hours. Death may occur from respiratory failure (paralysis of respiratory muscles) in 1-5 days if ticks are not removed. With North American tick paralysis, removal of all ticks results in quick improvement within 24 hours and complete recovery within 72 hours.



    Early clinical signs may include alteration of voice (laryngeal paralysis) followed by acute hindlimb weakness, incoordination, change in breathing rate, coughing, gagging, or vomiting. As the paralysis progresses, all four legs may be involved. The animal becomes unable to sit, stand, or lift its head. Respiration may initially increase and then becomes slower and labored. Regurgitation, saliva pooling, and gagging may be seen due to esophageal paralysis. Body temperature may be normal initially followed by hypothermia or hyperthermia.



    No specific tests are available to diagnose canine tick paralysis. It is diagnosed based on acute sudden onset of progressive hind limb paresis and paralysis in a tick-infested area. The offending tick may not be present by the time clinical signs begin. Blood and chemistry values are usually within the normal range.



    Signs of improvement are seen within 24 hours following removal of ticks. The presence of additional ticks or other causes of paralysis must be considered if the animal does not recover following tick removal. The prognosis in most cases is good.
     

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