Purina Start & Grow

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by PeacockMan, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. PeacockMan

    PeacockMan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does anyone know if Purina Start & Grow medicated starter have a wormer?
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    No and you shouldn't need to be worming baby chicks.
    Medicated starter of any brand is only a coccidiostat for the condition of coccidiosis.
     
  3. PeacockMan

    PeacockMan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cecal worms get bound up in the whole life cycle and can be in the embryo before the chick is born. What should I do about them if young chicks should not be wormed?
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    A healthy bird can sustain a minor parasite load.
    I don't live in the south where it never gets cold and apparently worms are a bigger issue but I've never had to worm a chicken in my life. That's thousands of chickens and hatching many hundreds of eggs. If you have a concern have a fecal sample done by a vet or contact your state agricultural extension office to find where to have it done.
    I wouldn't worm any animal unless I knew they had worms.

    Prophylactic worming can bring about resistant worms in as little as 6 generations unless the medication is changed frequently.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  5. BlazeJester

    BlazeJester Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have had my barred rocks on bare dirt in Georgia for 3 years since they were 4 weeks old and they have never, ever had a parasite load that became a problem. They have also never been wormed.

    Let the horse go before the cart. Baby chicks are already stressed enough as is. You should be concerned about your source of chicks if you know you will have a problem with cecal worms in the parent population. I very much suspect that breeder flocks are maintained as necessary for large hatchery supply (Cackle, Ideal, McMurray, Meyer, etc).

    I wormed my young laying flock and it was both completely unnecessary and expensive. I will use old wives remedies like cayenne pepper and squash seeds and treat once a year during molt from this point forward. There are people who swear by worming on the order of several times a year in the south, but I suppose it's a matter of objective. I can't afford to lose a month's worth of eggs three or four times a year.
     
  6. PeacockMan

    PeacockMan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I raise peacock. Chickens are more resistant carriers of cecal worms. The eggs can live in soil for up to two years. So peacock, turkey, pheasant and the like should never range where chickens have been nor should they ever be housed or cooped where chickens have stayed as they are less resistant. The cecal worm is even more problematic because it carries the heterakis gallinae protozan which can also be passed through the egg. Older birds of this kind become resistant carriers if they make it to six months of age but it is deadly to chicks. I have yet to find young peacock, turkey or pheasants that can "carry a load of it" and remain healthy.
     

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