Purple black shoulder male x Indiablue hen=????.

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by pedda munnangi, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. pedda munnangi

    pedda munnangi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Purple black shouldermale x Indiablue hen=???. I know we get Indiablue/purple/blackshoulder male chicks. All the female chicks will inherit one gene each of Indiablue, purple and black shoulder.What would be the phenotypical appearance of the female chicks? Is it Indiablue or purple ? (ofcourse split to other two colors). Thanks
     
  2. connerhills

    connerhills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All female chicks will be purple .. A sex link color in your case will only be purple females split to BS..
     
  3. pedda munnangi

    pedda munnangi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks my friend.My question now is What happened to the India blue gene(B) in this purple chick.. Is it still there in its blood or not.? In othewords this purple female is not only split for blackshoulder but also questionably split to Indiablue ?.
     
  4. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    ok on sexlink only the male has two gene , hen only has one.

    so in your case the male has purple and purple....the hen only has Blue

    so chick get one from each parent in case of the male chicks, but female only get one from their father.

    so male chicks will be blue/purple....now females only get one from father ,so if he is purple/purple all his daughters will be purple.


    if the father was blue/purple , depend which gene the daughter get some purple some blue.


    reason females can't be split to a sexlink color


    blackshoulder are not carried on the sex genes
     
  5. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    There is no single "India Blue" gene. "India Blue" is the "normal" version of the species, and this species has many, many genes. When there is a mutation in a gene, there now exists more than one version -- the "normal" version (called "India Blue") and whatever the mutated gene might be. In your birds' case, there is a mutation in one gene that causes the Black Shoulder phenotype. The "normal" version of that gene is the one that leaves the regular barred pattern on males' wings, and full pigmentation on hens. There is also a mutation in another gene that causes the Purple phenotype. The "normal" version of that gene is the one that leaves the regular blue color, and the mutated version changes that color to purple. With respect to both of these genes, we refer to the "normal" version as being "India Blue."

    Because the mutated gene that causes Purple lies on the Z chromosome, it is what we call "sex-linked." Female birds have only one Z chromosome, while males have two. When a recessive mutation occurs, the phenotype which is produced from it requires that there exist no "normal" version on the other chromosome to "interfere." With sex-linked recessive genes, females need only one copy of the gene, because there is no other Z chromosome. The "normal" or "India Blue" version of the Purple gene does not exist on a Purple hen -- she has only one Z chromosome, and the version of that one gene is Purple. But if the only mutation she shows is Purple, then she still has "India Blue" (i.e. "normal") versions of her other genes -- she is not Black Shoulder, she is not Pied, she is not White, she is not White-Eyed, etc. However, with respect to the Purple gene, she does not have the "normal" or "India Blue" version of that gene.

    If I'm being too verbose, please let me know. I'll try to clarify further if I'm not being understood. It's been a long night at work.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    yes sexlink colors are on the sex chromosomes........in birds the female only has one , so far only colors are sex link , no pattern have been found sex link.
     

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