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Pus from sinus

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by estherstar, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. estherstar

    estherstar New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2008
    A chicken that I care for at our preschool presented with closed eye last week. Upon investigation, her sinus were discharging smelly clear/bloody fluid on one side and cheesy pus on the other. I was able to get a big blockage out of one side. My "chicken lady" said it sounded like a sinus infection. I've been treating with terramycin to the water for 7 days, but there' really not a lot of improvement. She also appears to have diarrhea which was occuring before the antibiotics. She eats and drinks fine and none of the other chickens have any problems (she is silkie).

    After some searching on-line I came up with two possible afflictions. I will take her to the vet tomorrow but would appreciate an experienced opinion if there is one. Sorry for such a long post. Many Thanks!

    Fowl cholera

    Fowl cholera is an infectious bacterial disease of poultry. With an acute outbreak, suddenunexpected deaths occur in the flock. Laying hens may be found dead on the nest. Sick birdsshow anorexia, depression, cyanosis, rales, discharge from eyes and nose, white watery or greenmucoid diarrhea, and egg production is decreased.
    As fowl cholera becomes chronic, chickens develop abscessed wattles and swelling of jointsand foot pads. Cheesy pus may accumulate in the sinuses under the eyes.
    Flocks can be treated with a sulfa drug. Sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for use in pulletsolder than 14 weeks or for commercial laying hens. Sulfa drugs cause residues in meat andeggs. Prolonged use of sulfa drugs is toxic and causes a decrease in production in layinghens. Antibiotics can be used, but require higher levels and longer medication to stop theoutbreak.
    Where fowl cholera is endemic, live and/or inactivated vaccines are recommended. Do not startvaccinating for fowl cholera until it becomes a problem on the farm and a diagnosis is confirmed.

    Infectious coryza

    Coryza is a respiratory disease of chickens. Common clinical signs nclude swelling and puffinessaround the face and wattles, a thick sticky discharge with a characteristic offensive odorfrom the nostrils, labored breathing, and rales. There is a drop in feed and water consumptionas well as egg production.
    Sulfadimethoxine (Albon) is the preferred treatment for infectious coryza. If Albon failsor is not available, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, or erythromycin (Gallimycin) can be usedas alternative treatments. The sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for pullets older than 14weeks or for commercial laying hens.
    A vaccine for infectious coryza is available. It is given subcutaneously (under the skin)on the back of the neck. Chicks are usually vaccinated four times, starting at 5 weeks ofage (i.e., at 5, 9, 15, and 19 weeks with at least 4 weeks between injections). Vaccinate againat 10 months of age and twice yearly thereafter.
     
  2. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    you could try treating with Sulmet, or Tylan 50 injectible.
    1cc syringes and 25 gauge needles.
    alcohol wipes.
    can be given IM, SQ, and orally.

    Sulmet treats cocci..but if she is acting and eating fine..
    treat with Tylan..and clean the eye and mucus..
    Tylan is found at most farm/feed/livestock supply stores in the LIVESTOCK section.

    what color are the droppings?
     
  3. estherstar

    estherstar New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2008
    Thanks for the reply. Prior to getting any information back here or from my other source, I found a site that recommended albon orally. I was out of town but had somebody give her the meds while I was away. Her symptoms are not as severe, but she does still have discharge from the nose. Her poop is dark brown/black/green and very runny. Now that I know about the Tylan, I will try that and discontinue the albon. Daily injections for how many days?

    This chicken has been around all of the other chickens at the school. Two chicks were hatched out and I was planning on bringing them home at the end of summer. I have one chick that needed extra help and has not been with the group at all. Will the chicks that have been exposed to coryza (but are healthy) possibly infect my chick at home?
     
  4. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2008
  5. estherstar

    estherstar New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2008
    Thank you for that. I think perhaps I should just take her to the vet to find out exactly what's going on. She is eating great...has actually put on weight since on the albon...but still problems with the sinus to a lesser degree. I'll keep you posted on her progress.

    Thanks!
     
  6. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    it isn't unusual for them to have both cocci and respiratory..
    either one lowers the immune system and makes them vulnerable to the other.
     
  7. spydertoys

    spydertoys Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 19, 2008
    Munfordville, Kentucky
    I have a similar problem with a respiratory condition in some 6 week old chicks. I was only able to get LS-50...no one carries much for chickens around here. Can someone help me with the dosage per gallon. ??
    The bottle says 50-65 mg per gallon. I have no clue how much that is and can't seem to find a conversion chart with milligrams on it.
    Thanks!
     

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