Putting different breeds together?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Alugo, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. Alugo

    Alugo In the Brooder

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    Hello - I am a soon to be new chicken owner and was wondering if you can have any chicken breeds together? I know that you can have a few but is there a limit? Does it matter if I buy an odd number or a single one? I don't want anyone to feel left out lol but I was thinking about RIR, Easter Eggers, Silver laced Wyandottes, and then possibly a Silkie or two for my son.... We want them as pets and egglayers - any advice is greatly appreciated! I would like to place my order asap! [​IMG] I'm excited.
     
  2. I usually mix my birds.. the only ones I separate out are meat birds from my layers
    unless I have a specific breeding I want to do .. then I will pull the rooster and hens and put them in the "honeymoon suite"

    so far (51 years of being on this earth and having chickens through all of them) we have never had a problem between the different sizes of birds that warranted separating them.. when we have had a mean rooster.. he would be culled regardless of his size.
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:Agreed.

    I have all brahmas in one coop. The other coop has silkies, turkens, speckled sussex, salmon faverolles, polish, easter eggers and a bunch of mixed half-grown chicks.
     
  4. TheSpiceGirls

    TheSpiceGirls Crowing

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    I have three different breeds and they get along just fine for the most part. Be careful of Orpington's as they are so docile they tend to get picked on. I wish I had two Orpington's so they could hang together. And I'll add one when she goes broody and let her raise it. But the Jersey Giant and EE are buds. I even call the EE Mini Me because she just mimic's the JG. The JG says BAWWWWK, the EE says BAWWWWK. The JG runs over to scratch at a plant and the EE is right there next to her.
     
  5. Alugo

    Alugo In the Brooder

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    Quote:Agreed.

    I have all brahmas in one coop. The other coop has silkies, turkens, speckled sussex, salmon faverolles, polish, easter eggers and a bunch of mixed half-grown chicks.

    I was looking into adding one brahma bantam as well - but then would I have to separate it? Also what is the difference of meat vs layer - (assuming birds for eating and then birds only for eggs? correct me if I am wrong) Because for now I am just raising for eggs - not that I would be opposed to meat birds - I just would have no idea what to do when it was time to get it done [​IMG] thanks
     
  6. chicknerd

    chicknerd Songster

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    I have several varieties together. I remember reading if you do this you should have at least 2 of each breed so they have a buddy. I have about 25 chickens of several varieties. The only one who is a single is my Barred Rock. I lost her friend at 10 weeks and was never able to replace her. Funny but my BOs are the head group and Harriette, my BR is one of 'them.'
     
  7. ErinG

    ErinG Songster

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    We have one banty (silkies are banties too you know) mixed with 4 standard sized. She does get picked on, and even though she is my favorite, if we were to do it over, I would get all of the same size. I know there is always an underdog, but when they are so much smaller, they are really at a disadvantage.
     
  8. Quote:Agreed.

    I have all brahmas in one coop. The other coop has silkies, turkens, speckled sussex, salmon faverolles, polish, easter eggers and a bunch of mixed half-grown chicks.

    I was looking into adding one brahma bantam as well - but then would I have to separate it? Also what is the difference of meat vs layer - (assuming birds for eating and then birds only for eggs? correct me if I am wrong) Because for now I am just raising for eggs - not that I would be opposed to meat birds - I just would have no idea what to do when it was time to get it done [​IMG] thanks

    Meaties are breeds like the Cornish Cross.. something that is raised strictly for meat.. they tend to grow very fast.. put on a lot of weight and health issues if not processed at a fairly young age

    I do have some "dual purpose" roosters that are being kept separate from the layers.. they are breeds that can be used for meat or eggs.. for mine i have them separated just because it's easier on my husband .. this way he knows who is destined for freezer camp and who isn't
    being a bantam I don't see any problem with mixing him into your flock.. I've never had a brahma bantam before though... so I don't know much about their personality
     
  9. Quote:I have silkies, d Uccle's and cochin bantams that are in with my standards.. and go figure.. it's my polish that are on the low end of the pecking order.. i have seen my silkies kick their butts on more than one occasion
     
  10. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I agree with having at least two of each breed. I have an accidental buff brahma hen in with the LF brahmas. She's never been picked on and is close to the top of the pecking order ladder. Brahmas are the most docile, sweetest things. I love my brahma girls. Loved my brahma rooster too. Unfortunately he had a chronic painful leg problem and had to be put down.
     

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