Quail Housing?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by catcrazy37, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. catcrazy37

    catcrazy37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First of all, I've seen two opinions regarding roofing:
    1. Give them a low roof so they can't jump.
    2. Give them a soft roof so they don't get injured.
    Which would you say is better, or would you suggest something else?

    Also, I'm wondering about the coop is made of/from in general.

    I'm new to quail so any info is appreciated :)

    EDIT: Another question. How separate do you have to keep them from chickens?
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017
  2. BobDBirdDog

    BobDBirdDog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It all depends on if you are raising them as a pet in a limited amount of space, as meat/egg production birds, or for hunting (flight ready birds).

    Low roofs will restrict you from entering the pen, so they are usually reserved for small areas where you will manage the birds in a 2x2 or larger cage up to about 6-8 feet, and the roof being less than a foot high. Pens/cages of this natrure are usually for pets and/or productions of meat/egg birds. In the latter concept, you are simply limiting the bird movements (fattening it up) or using it for egg producers, so there is no need for high roofs or a chance to fly.

    In pens/Coops, you want at least enough height so you can walk in the area without being hunched over. The roof netting above needs to be soft netting of some nature so they do not spook and fly up and break their necks. Quail will usually run away from dangers, but if spooked by a night predator they may or willl burst into flight to evade the dangers, thus the soft loose netting.

    Most coops (shelters) are of general construction from old barns to whatever you decide on. The pen area is usually a wood structure that can resemble a loosely framed open area (4 walls) of fenced in sides, or 8 foot tall pole structures (too any length and width you can afford) that are also fenced on the sides. The netting above can be 8-20 feet in height....it all depends on what your desires are.
     
  3. catcrazy37

    catcrazy37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I probably should have been more specific. These would be pet quail, in a small indoor cage.
    If they were in a foot high cage, couldn't they still conk their heads?
     
  4. jenni wren

    jenni wren Just Hatched

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    Hey there catcrazy,
    I new to quail keeping so I'm not speaking from experience, from what I have read I think low roofs discourage the quails from flying so they shouldn't bump their heads, I'm sure someone more experienced will correct me if I'm wrong.

    If you haven't already seen it this thread is great for housing ideas.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/280575/show-me-your-quail-pens

    Take care.
     
  5. BobDBirdDog

    BobDBirdDog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most quail (bobwhites) are about 8-10 inches tall standing upright. Most all are grounded birds but can burst into flights in a seconds notice and as surprising speed. However, flight is usually at last resort to evade dangers.

    A 12 inch tall pen is not going to allow them to burst into flight and build up the sudden speed and inertia (force) as to hit their heads and break their necks.

    Besides, keeping them in the house as caged pets, they will tame and flight will not be the major issue.
     
  6. catcrazy37

    catcrazy37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So they don't have time to build up the speed? That makes sense.
    Thanks for the replies!
     
  7. Binki

    Binki Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I zip tied some bird netting (used to protect fruit trees, bought at home and hardware store) to the top of my pet quail cage.

    Since its domed, there's enough room for them to safely bounce off of it. I also don't use hard stuff in the cage like metal containers etc. in case they hit it :p

    They don't flush out of fear often at all although I have heard them a handful of times during the night. When they flap around happily in a spaz popcorn dance, the netting helps to prevent injuries from that as well :p

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