Quarantine question.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ChristieB, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. ChristieB

    ChristieB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi, I will have had my new hens for 2 weeks tomorrow, my original 3 are kept in the front yard and the new ones are out the back in the quarantine coop . My question is, it goes against all I believe to keep them locked up 24/7, I've already had to separate one hen (right beside with full visibility to each other) as she was bullying the younger ones not letting them eat or drink. I feel like if they had more space this bullying wouldn't even be an issue. SO!! Can I let them out to range in a run in the backyard during the day , they wouldn't be any closer to the old flock but once they are integrated the old flock will be going out the back where there's more space for them all. Has it been long enough for any internal parasites to have been eliminated and not contaminate the ground?
    Tia
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not so much internal parasites they are quarantined for as it is respiratory disease. I agree, keeping them locked up is a bad solution, though. You really need two separate coops and yards to do it properly, and they need to be a good distance apart as well. Not everyone can manage it. If you don't see any sign of runny nose or eyes, sneezes or coughs, I might very well take the chance and let them mix at this point. Even a month is not a 100% guarantee there is no illness. Good luck!
     
  3. getaclue

    getaclue Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I personally have seen what can happen when quarantine periods are not observed. Many on here have not observed a quarantine period without any adverse results, however, there are quite a few posts that the opposite is true. It just depends on whether you want to take the risk with your healthy, established flock. You only have 1 more week to go, before you can start introductions, so hang in there. Pecking order, and bullying are not issues that always disappear immediately, even when free ranging, especially when there are age differences. There are plenty of posts regarding introducing new members to your flock. Introductions may take a little time. Be patient.

    Parasites, both external, and internal is just a small portion of what you should be checking for. Here is a list of routine things to check. I do not claim this is a complete list, and others may offer more things to check too, but this is a good start.

    Pick each one up daily, and check for the following:
    Lice, and mites
    Listen to their breathing, no rattles, or congestion
    Check their nostrils, no discharge
    Look at their eyes, bright and clear, no bubbles, or discharge
    Look a their combs, and wattles for normal coloring for their age, no white powdery places, no scabs, no stick tight fleas.
    Check their legs, scales laying down tight.
    Check their vents, no foul odor, no pasty butt, or discharge, no redness or swelling.
    Keep track of food, and water to make sure they are eating, and drinking properly. When introducing new flock members, provide extra waterers, and feeders at opposite ends of their area to ensure they all get food, and water. You may put an obstacle, (ie. part of a hay bale, or a whole one), space permitting, towards the center for the younger ones to escape to the bullying, and hide behind.
    Check faces for swelling
    Check for strong and/or foul odor
    Check pooh
     
  4. ChristieB

    ChristieB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't want to introduce them yet I was asking if I can let the new ones into a run so they aren't cooped up, they are in the back yard and my 3 are in the front yard with the house between them, they couldn't get any further apart and still be on our property. They wouldn't be any closer together I just want to know if I can let them into a run that my others will eventually go in
     
  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I think that should work. Those birds do need to get outside.
     
  6. getaclue

    getaclue Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    That is something you will have to decide for yourself.
     

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