"Que sera, que sera"

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by BarredBuff, May 15, 2010.

  1. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is welsh for what will be, will be. I have several tales to tell so heres the first. My Barred Rock rooster has been sick and he has been in the rabbit hutch for a week. I also have another rooster in the flock, and when I let the BR out the RIR when after him. The BR is on his way out as I type, if he does make until the weekend is over I guess I will have to cull him because he cant live with a disability and he cant be put back in the flock. What would you do if you were in my shoes? I got my first broody this May and I was extremely thrilled that one of my hens was gonna set eggs and hatch em. Yesturday evening I found her with an injured hindquarter and she was not walking she was hobbling around. So I stuck her in the rabbit hutch she had green flies on her and maggots on her wound. What would you do with her, she has a disability so if she does make it she will hobbe for forever? By the way this all happened in the same day. I am now done to 14 hens and 1 rooster. What should I do with these sick chickens?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  2. MareeZoCool

    MareeZoCool Chillin' With My Peeps

    The hens laying eggs for you? KEEP feeding them and caring for them as usual. They don't need a roo to produce eggs, only need roos if you want to hatch out some new peeps to increase your flock.
    *****EDITED********
    I di not mean to imply that you should kill your injured roo or any disabled hen.
    My apologies if my comment offended or caused confusion. I have NOT killed off any of my chickens............. not even my little rebel hen, the wandering runaway. OK?[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2010
  3. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    Well, it is your decision............... but you are talking to someone who has had a lot of poultry with disabilities and have enjoyed all the time and joy they have given me. I have done surgeries, built wheel chairs and slings, splinted and cast, amputated, tube fed, and almost everything under the sun. I have a little blind hen that still lays eggs everday, and I get so much joy watching her do her funny scratch dance to find her food. She sings and dances and is happy despite her situation. I understand not everyone is in the situation to keep a disabled pet, if they are fine in other ways perhaps see if you can find someone who may benefit by taking care of them. If not, ending suffering is part of caring for animals too. Best Wishes with your decision.
     
  4. ICallMyselfCherie'

    ICallMyselfCherie' Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, if I were you I'd probably do everything I could to keep them alive . . . I'm just too soft-hearted to take any other road.

    But regardless of what else you do, I would DEFINITELY clean up the wound with the maggots in it. That would be the simplest part of the solution, and probably make the most difference in the immediate -- and longterm -- comfort of the hen. Believe me, that type of flesh wound is truly the most horrible for an animal to go through. I have had experience with animals who have had maggots in their wounds, and it is truly awful. It will start off small and get worse and worse. More and more flesh will die, and it will get into the fat, muscle, and eventually even the bone. But if you clean it up and put ointment on her, you can most likely reverse that completely. Whatever else you do, I would say, please, please take care of the maggots and then go from there.

    Good luck, I hope your hens get healthy again!!!
     
  5. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:You did not offend me at all its me who should be apologizing because I didnt make it clear the first time.
     
  6. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The hen did die. We HAD to shoot the roo he got to where he couldwnt walk and he wouldnt he eat, he was a mess.
     

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