Question about breeding chickens.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mpgo4th, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. mpgo4th

    mpgo4th Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I will start breeding my RIR to my sex links this coming spring when he is mature. Out of the chicks I keep I would like to start another laying flock and keep one rooster for protection of them. This new rooster will most likely breed with his "sisters" and they will lay eggs. My question is can I hatch out those eggs or will I get messed up chicks? I'm not looking to sell them just to keep a current laying stock.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2013
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Chickens are birds and can easily breed their "sisters". Not a problem. Breeders don't find this cross to be ideal, but you won't get messed up chicks or anything weird.

    If fact, if you trap nest during egg collection and mark the eggs you'd be able to record which chick came from which hen. He'd only be 100% brother to chicks that also came from his mother.

    Frankly, I'd use the rooster you have now for a couple of generations and you'd avoid the whole issue.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2013
  3. mithious

    mithious Chillin' With My Peeps

    You should be fine, father to daughter is line breeding, in- breeding is brother to sister, but still is used to keep certain qualities in the flock...I would breed back to the parent, if it was me, or try to find another roo from a different line. That would mean you would breed the second roo, to one of your older hens...always breed up also...take your best of your best and breed those, NEVER EVER breed lesser quality birds, as you will just end up with problems...pick, not only for color and looks, but for behavior also. If you have a roo that is human aggressive, or not very nice to "his" hens, I would not recommend breeding that roo, same for the hens...pick your best birds to breed. Do you mind if I ask if these are hatchery birds? If they are, you could find some interesting chicks being hatched, as the hatcheries will breed all kinds of different breeds into what they are calling the line of birds they sold you...unless they come from a breeder, you might not get what you want!

    I have read on here, that in-breeding and line-breeding, can be used for up to 9 generations, I believe that is the correct number?! But I would suggest checking that, as my memory isn't the best [​IMG] [​IMG] There is a whole thread on here that talks about breeding, great place to learn from the experts that are breeding heritage birds also...so just to be clear, even if you don't intend to show, always always, pick your best birds to breed!!! and be ready to cull birds that are not showing the traits you want...

    Again, father to daughter, mother to son is line breeding, siblings is in breeding...best to line breed but breeders DO in breed sometimes!!! Check out the thread on breeding, it's got great info!

    Best of luck!
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Just to toss this out, but when you breed red sex links, which are mix/mutts the results can be odd and mixed. Some of the chicks from a RIR over RSL will be reddish, others pretty much like their sire, while some will appear more white with some red bleeding and so forth. Most will look like production reds.

    Line breeding is really a feature of breeding pure bred or standard bred poultry. Starting out with sexlinks will make fine enough chickens. Even good laying chickens. Still. Selecting is the key. Select only the top 4 hens for your breeding pens. From these four hens, you can hatch enough replacement birds for you, your neighbor and the guy down the road, so to speak.

    Random flock breeding, meaning just randomly collecting eggs from a rooster over a flock of 8 to 10 hens is not really breeding, it is propagation.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Owing to the matings planned and fact the rooster and his sisters are already crosses, the resulting offspring are going to be all over the place genetically. This will be to such a degree as to swamp any effects of inbreeding.
     
  6. chick little

    chick little Out Of The Brooder

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    If I breed my golden buff girls with my with my aseel roo what will I get any one know where you can download a chicken calculator
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. mpgo4th

    mpgo4th Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So breed the father to a daughter?
     
  8. mpgo4th

    mpgo4th Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The RSL are hatchery birds from tractor supply but the RIR roo is from a breeder in South Carolina. The RSL colors are varied but I have a few that are beautiful birds. They have only red wing tips and tips of their tails. Other wise they look like production reds. This is strictly for my egg production personal use.
     
  9. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    1. Breed your RIR cockbird over the best 4 RSL hens you select. Your selection criteria would be personal preference. Size, vigor, laying ability, looks, temperament, etc.

    2. Hatch out as many chicks as you wish, times two for the cockerel factor. LOL

    3. Next year breed the next generation of selected daughters back under their sire (father). This is classic line breeding.

    But more important than strict line breeding, for your purposes, is the selection process. Centrarchid is correct. You have a ton of DNA so inbreeding is not a worry for a long, long time. However, always breed your best birds only. Random breeding spirals everything downward. Selection is absolutely necessary for flock improvement.

    BTW, I've done this cross. Here are some photos of the resultant young pullets.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. mpgo4th

    mpgo4th Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, look like hatchery ordered production reds! They look great. This is my plan for replacement pullets.
     

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