Question about Breeds

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by eeiko321, Jan 17, 2009.

  1. eeiko321

    eeiko321 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    HI guys...
    I'm from Australia, i have not seen many Rhode Island Reds, New Hampshire Red etc etc.
    And Australian bred chickens Australorps apparently are one of the best layers and are black...but Yet i don't see many sell them.

    most breeders here seem to sell 'ISA BROWNS' i do know that chickens behaviours vary & human contact can vary.. e.g Foghorn & white stars can take a LONG time to get used to human contact as an average. but I'm guessing their attitudes are personality can vary like humans also.

    Ive all up owned 3 chickens, 2 currently alive & one dead a while back.
    the 2 alive is a New Hampshire Red & the other alive & dead one were ISA BROWNS...

    Ive had a very bad experience with ISA's...from experience they seem more slower in learning. e.g training it to lay in a spot or where to roost. and both Isa's could never get used to be grabbing it to check for lice etc.

    the New Hampshire was terrified when i first came into contact with it...but grew really fond of our family very very rapidly.
    i could walk up to it..gently pick it up and put it back down with my eyes closed.

    Isa's on the other hand...they RUN!... the kick and bite. perhaps due to the fact that they are young and the new Hampshire is slightly old. but the Isa's are very greedy, they snatch food & run up to me only if i have food.


    i want to hear other peoples opinions here with experience..
    I'm starting to think all ISA'S are slightly aggressive, very very Greedy when it comes to food. & nervous with human contact.

    so if i was ever to get more chickens.....im steering clear of ISA'S
     
  2. eeiko321

    eeiko321 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 1, 2008
    anyone?
     
  3. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    Closest thing I have to an Isa Brown is a Red Star and she is dumb as a rock. BIG HEN. Big brown eggs but not that often. We are thinking of processing her.

    I also have a Cinnamon Queen (also a red sex link), she just started laying tiny cream colored eggs. She is extremely flighty, but doesn't mind spending time with our new Chinese game roo.

    I've heard that Isa's do very well in clean, dry environments and that they lay a bunch!
     
  4. paduanchook

    paduanchook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    im with you in the fact i dont like nervouse breeds, thats why i dont like leghorns. but i have astralorps, ri reds, new hamps, and easter eggers. and california whites and they all eat out of my hands and are very friendly..but if u want really really friendly go with silkies or cochins imo.
     
  5. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My friendliest birds are my Buff Orp and my Black Sex Link.
     
  6. kpborkowski

    kpborkowski Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm from Aust too but don't have any personal experience with ISA brown's. Although a friend of mine does have 3 and she says they are reliable layers and really friendly (maybe it depends on where they came from???)

    We have bantam RIR's, pekins and a silkie all are really friendly. We are adding to the flock tomorrow with two Wyandottes (fingers crossed they are nice chooks). I'm not sure where you are in Aust but in Melb there is a hatchery up in the Dandenongs called Abundant Layers that sell quite a large selection of different breeds incl the Australorp.
     
  7. Highlander

    Highlander Tartan Terror

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    I have Isa Browns. They are the only breed I have had and I have had no problems with them at all. They are very friendly, will follow me around everywhere. They let me and my children pick them up and come running when I call them! They are unbelievable layers, and yes, you are right, they are greedy but that just makes it easier to train them to do what you want them to do. [​IMG]
     
  8. eeiko321

    eeiko321 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:i find them very difficult to train...extremely slow learners...it took me 1 week to get it to learn where to roost as it would even barely get into the coop. where it took my New Hampshire 1 day to learn it!!!!

    for the ISAS, apprently everyone has told me they are greedy..(from other forums)...
    and it could be due to the fact of thier High demands of protein & nutrients from thier body for thier mass laying capablilities.
    yes they are good layers i can tell you that...guarranteed 1 egg a day for 7 days nearly.



    paduanchook
    Today 2:37 am - im with you in the fact i dont like nervouse breeds, thats why i dont like leghorns. but i have astralorps, ri reds, new hamps, and easter eggers. and california whites and they all eat out of my hands and are very friendly..but if u want really really friendly go with silkies or cochins imo.

    i wouldnt mind bantums, but they are too small...and i know larger hens can pick on them.
    what happend was that the first ISA that died, she bit me on the lip one time and tore at it...because it didnt like being held. it used to struggle like as if it was going to die.

    Then we got a new one to replace it...on day 1, when i decided to clip its wings, due to it being jumpy...it started biting the scissors. and another incident it started tearing my skin on my hand when i was checking for lice.


    kpborkowski
    Today 5:20 am - I'm from Aust too but don't have any personal experience with ISA brown's. Although a friend of mine does have 3 and she says they are reliable layers and really friendly (maybe it depends on where they came from???)

    We have bantam RIR's, pekins and a silkie all are really friendly. We are adding to the flock tomorrow with two Wyandottes (fingers crossed they are nice chooks). I'm not sure where you are in Aust but in Melb there is a hatchery up in the Dandenongs called Abundant Layers that sell quite a large selection of different breeds incl the Australorp.

    well im from sydney
    i dont think there is much here.
    i do know there are alot in QLD and Melbourne...
    im excited of getting an Australorp, as they are said to be very very friendly and bred for the australian environment.


    Mahonri
    Today 2:31 am - Closest thing I have to an Isa Brown is a Red Star and she is dumb as a rock. BIG HEN. Big brown eggs but not that often. We are thinking of processing her.

    I also have a Cinnamon Queen (also a red sex link), she just started laying tiny cream colored eggs. She is extremely flighty, but doesn't mind spending time with our new Chinese game roo.

    I've heard that Isa's do very well in clean, dry environments and that they lay a bunch!

    well ive kinda noticed somehthing....it has alot more feathers compared to the new Hampshire..and during hot weather, it pants so much more than the new hamp.

    and it seems to be more prone to Lice than the other....im guessing due to the fact of thicker feathers.​
     
  9. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    If you ever do get a chance at some Australorp hens, TAKE IT! My pullet is the sweetest thing, I know you'll love them! She hasn't started laying yet but she should be in a few weeks. Same thing with the Rhode Islands, I also have one and she is very nice. They were both raised together and get along great. If you see some available, don't waste the opportunity! [​IMG]
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Theoretically your comment about bantam vs standard hens sounds like it should be correct, but it absolutely does not jive with my experience. I have one silkie hen who is a little terror in letting the world of much larger hens and the occasional rooster know that SHE is the Queen of the Coop and Yard. I've never had a large hen bully a small one.


    No Isa Browns here, but it sounds like you should find a different breed altogether.

    It also sounds like you need to learn to handle your birds a bit differently.

    I would suggest that if you get chicks you handle them frequently and very gently every day. Put your hand down low in the brooder for them to see--try not to swoop down from above like an airborne predator (sometimes hard to do, depending on how you have your brooder set up).

    Once you are holding an individual chick, rest its feet so that they aren't dangling, gently stroke its back and throat. Keep holding and stroking well after its calmed down. Then gently return it to the brooder and allow it to hop down from your hand.


    If you get older birds, try to get ones that have already been handled. And also treat them in the same gentle manner as for chicks. Try not to grab or chase. Getting birds off the roost at night is very easy (unless they roost in a tall tree, lol), so when you need to check for lice, gently pick a bird off its roost, wrap in a towel and take her inside where there is sufficient light for you to check. Afterwards hold her on you lap for awhile and stroke her back and neck. Feed her a small piece of fruit as a treat (or a bit of whatever you had for dinner).

    When you first get your birds, leave them locked in the coop for several days before letting them out to range or into their pen--let them get used to home. If they want to roost, they will; if they don't, then for some reason they don't care for the roosts you've provided--they may be too low, too high, too narrow, too wide, too... Or the birds may be too young. In any case, let them decide--it will not hurt them to not roost.

    It sounds to me like your Isas have been afraid of you--that's what the biting, kicking and struggling is, and that is why they run away or grab food and run away.

    If you do take your remaining Isa off her coop, wrap her in a towel, set her on your lap and gently stroke her every night, she will probably mellow towards you somewhat, and she may even start liking the same TV programs you watch, lol.
     

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