Question about bumblefoot

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DurbanGirl, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. DurbanGirl

    DurbanGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2012
    Portland, OR
    I have a hen who I've been treating for bumblefoot for the last 3 weeks. After initially removing a large "plug" from her foot - I've been keeping it clean and wrapped. It doesn't look infected at all - and the hole looks nice and clean as long as I keep it wrapped.

    My question is:

    Will the hole in her foot eventually close up?

    The tissue looks white and healthy - but shows no sign of filling in the hole that the bumble left behind. I'm afraid that if I let her run around without a bandage - the hole will collect dirt and get infected again. Any advise would be appreciated!


    Thanks
    Deirdre
     
  2. WI FarmChick

    WI FarmChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2012
    Wisconsin
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Three weeks is a long time for a hole to heal and close up. Usually it varies from a few days to a week at most, they heal quickly. Put iodine or betadine on the gauze and pack the hole with neosporin. Then put the gauze over the packed hole and wrap it up. Leave it on for a couple of days, then remove the gauze and repeat everything I mentioned til it heals if you havnt already done so.
     
  4. DurbanGirl

    DurbanGirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 16, 2012
    Portland, OR
    There was never anything oozy or bleeding - I originally was able to get a large, hard kernel of pus out of her foot. The inside of the hole itself looks like healthy clean skin - it just shows no sign of closing - and it's quite a large hole. Usually skin that is actively healing looks a little pink and raw. I'm just wondering if she's going to permanently have this hole in her foot. The only way to keep dirt out of it is to keep it wrapped - I've been doing that with triple antibiotic covered with gauze and vetwrap.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    You can keep doing what you're doing. Or perhaps caging her with feed and water, leaving it unbandaged and fresh air hitting it will help it heal quicker. You'll have to change the litter quite often to keep feces from getting into the wound. I would only do this as a last resort.
     

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