Question about butchering #2

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by guardianoftheflock, Apr 21, 2019.

  1. guardianoftheflock

    guardianoftheflock Songster

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    Howdy y'all! I have a strange sorta question. I've been butchering today and was wondering, should you wait any amount of time before eating the meat? Like...is there some sorta curing process? Thanks in advance for y'all's help!:):)
     
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  2. garp94

    garp94 Songster

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    Yes, letting the meat 'rest' lets it go through rigor mortis and then relax. I forget if the minimum is 1 or two days, but I try to let mine rest 3.
     
  3. garp94

    garp94 Songster

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    I used to think you could let it rest before or after freezing, but i've seen a few people comment that resting it before freezing [ if that's in the plan] is better. seems freezing kills some of the enzymes that tenderize the meat.
    That said, i've done both, and [ not having both side by side] haven't noticed any difference
     
  4. Granny Hatchet

    Granny Hatchet Tastes like chicken

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    Mine has gone straight to the freezer simply because I didnt know they were supposed to rest. Figured they had all the time in the world to rest in the freezer. LOL I dont know how tender they would of been though because I always made chicken dumplins on them.
     
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  5. rjohns39

    rjohns39 Addict

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    I've tested both methods with CX and turkeys (ducks just wait until they are limber). CX I let rest in the fridge or on Ice 24-48 hours, you can tell when they limber up. Turkeys take 3-4 days for the rigor to pass. If you're making soup or chicken and dumplings with them, it probably doesn't matter. I've also found it's a lot easier to do cut-ups after the rigor has passed. And just one last tip, the feet make a great addition to stock.
     
  6. guardianoftheflock

    guardianoftheflock Songster

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    Thanks! I thought I had heard something along those lines but wasn't possitive! I'll let it rest then.
     
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  7. guardianoftheflock

    guardianoftheflock Songster

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    Alright! I'll keep that in mind! Thanks for your insight!
     
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  8. guardianoftheflock

    guardianoftheflock Songster

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    Ah yes! I've heard about throwing the feet in to make stock! Thank you for your advice! Everyone on here is always super helpful! What is rigor? This is only my second time butchering so I'm not at all an expert. I've never heard that term before. Thank you again!
     
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  9. rjohns39

    rjohns39 Addict

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    rigor mortis. Generally within an hour of processing they'll be stiff as a board. Save your bones too. Roasted bones are great for bone broth. And depending on where you are, if you have a falcon club near you, they'll buy the heads. Of course, that's just one more sort bucket under the table.
     
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  10. trumpeting_angel

    trumpeting_angel Crowing

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    Are spending all your time in the great outdoors with your animals, and failing to watch detective shows on TV? That’s how I learned about rigor mortis! ;)

    :oops:
     

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