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question about comb dominance...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by LaSombra, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. LaSombra

    LaSombra Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 28, 2009
    Washington
    I'm just wondering if anyone knows which comb types are dominant to which others. The only info I have found on here is that pea combs are dominant to single combs. I was just wondering about other combs, such as rose comb, etc. Is there a chart somewhere to look this type of thing up?

    Thanks,
    Jen
     
  2. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Rose comb is dominant over single comb

    pea comb is incompletely dominant over single comb

    single comb is incompletely dominant over duplex comb (V comb)

    Rose comb and pea comb combine to make a walnut comb,

    Tim
     
  3. nzpouter

    nzpouter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    walnut = RRPP, RrPP, RrPp
    rosecomb = RRpp, Rrpp
    single = rrpp
    pea = rrPP, rrPp
     
  4. LaSombra

    LaSombra Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 28, 2009
    Washington
    hm. interesting. amazing that a single comb is recessive to the other types and, yet, so much more common. I realize it's because people have bred them that way but still interesting.

    Thanks for the info [​IMG]
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:I don't think it's so much because people have bred them that way, as because people have NOT often bred AWAY from it. Remember that single-comb is the wild type characteristic. An enormous number of common traits are recessive, actually.

    Also I have some vague recollection (??) that single combed fowl have been shown to have more mating success than <other>-combed ones?



    Pat
     
  6. LaSombra

    LaSombra Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 28, 2009
    Washington
    Quote:I don't think it's so much because people have bred them that way, as because people have NOT often bred AWAY from it. Remember that single-comb is the wild type characteristic. An enormous number of common traits are recessive, actually.

    Also I have some vague recollection (??) that single combed fowl have been shown to have more mating success than <other>-combed ones?



    Pat

    hm. good points...
     
  7. TimG

    TimG Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 23, 2008
    Maine
    I read today that Pea comb (P) is incompletely dominant while Rose comb (R) is completely dominant.

    I also read that there is reduced fertility in homozygous RR males; Rr males have normal fertility and out compete their RR counterparts. This may explain the tendency away from RR.

    Still wondering how the cushion comb fits into the equation.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2010
  8. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Comb genetics are not so clear cut.
    Often you will get a comb that is somewhere inbetween the two different type combs. For example with a rose comb and single comb you often end up with a crappy comb that is really neither one.

    As with peacomb and cushion comb. It is said that cushion comb is 60% dominate over peacomb. Again, you generally get a crappy comb the first generation that is not completely either one.

    Another example is the single comb x duplex comb cross: the first generation will give you a leaf comb. saladin
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Never heard of a leaf comb. I think the statement about fertility and single combs is incorrect--the one about RR males, though is accurate.

    Breda is the only recessive comb gene. Duplex is dominant. The v-form (D^V) is the most dominant of the duplex alleles, the cup-form (D^C) is dominant to not-duplex (d+).

    Single comb expresses only in the absence of other comb genes, with the exception of breda.
     
  10. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A leaf comb: is a duplex comb that "leafs" out. In other words it is not like spikes.
     

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