Question about concrete piers?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by domromer, Mar 31, 2009.

  1. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm planning my next coop. I'm going to build a simple shed type shelter. I want to house 6 chickens, winters are pretty harsh so I was going to give each bird 10sqft, I imagine the birds will spend some time in thier on snowy days.

    I've seen some other coops that were attached to concrete blocks that are laid directly on the ground. These blocks sort of look like triangles with the tops taken off.

    I was wondering how you attach the floor of the coop the blocks.
    Also are they heavy enough to keep the shelter from tipping in windy weather. I planned on making the shed 8x8 so I'm not sure how many blocks I'd need.

    Any advice or tips would be much appreciated.
     
  2. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    I would not use these as they don't fit real tight and would be very flimsey. here is what I have used in the past. I am a licensed building contractor and I use a very thick cardboard tube designed for use as piers, you can buy them at any building suppy store. dig down just a bit into the ground stand up the cut to height pier sleeve, pour in your concrete skreet it and let dry, if you want insert a threaded bolt into the concrete when still wet, for use as a bolt down later. these work great and are super stable.

    AL
     
  3. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How deep down would you pour the piers below ground level.
     
  4. acheeknmanbestfren

    acheeknmanbestfren Out Of The Brooder

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    In Springfield you don't really have to worry about the freeze thaw cycle so 12 - 18 inches would work just fine.

    To determine the number of blocks, what are you planning to use as the support structure for the floor - 4 X 6s or? Were it me, I'd probably use 4 X 4 pressure treated posts with 4 x 6 beams spaced 24" on center. I'd put a block at each corner and then every 4 feet on the beams for a total of 12.

    Incidentally, the surface blocks you asked about would probably do just fine, unless the coup will be elevated significantly I wouldn't worry about wind knocking it over were it me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  5. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I haven't changed my location yet. I actually live in Flagstaff Az, at 7000ft. So we get prenty of days below 0. With that information, how deep do you think I should go? Also how thick do the piers need to be?
     
  6. acheeknmanbestfren

    acheeknmanbestfren Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I would think 24" would be plenty, check with a builder or even a home depot guy to see what is normal for your area. As far a thickness, I'd think 8 - 12" would be plenty - 8 x 8 isn't going to be all that heavy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  7. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    !8" would be deep enough where you are. Since you are now digging holes for piers, have you thought about using pressure treated post instead? Much less work and cheaper. JMHO
     
  8. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't plan on digging piers. That's what interested me in concrete blocks. I just want to make sure the house won't tip over in the high winds. I'm looking for the simplest way to keep the hens safe in the wind.
     
  9. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well, how about just driving in some metal T posts and securing it all to that? If, you've ever had to pull those suckers out, you know the wind won't do it.
     
  10. domromer

    domromer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well, how about just driving in some metal T posts and securing it all to that? If, you've ever had to pull those suckers out, you know the wind won't do it.

    I'm not sure what metal t posts are? But if it's cheap and easy I'd love to hear about it.
     

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