Question about herbicides and chickens

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by hipmarye, May 8, 2007.

  1. hipmarye

    hipmarye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2007
    Mississippi
    My husband has been finishing up the coop and we were planning on putting the chicken out during the day (they are 4 weeks old) and bringing them back in at night until they were fully feathered. In the mean time, we have had a problem with poison ivy in our yard. I tried to avoid using any herbicide, but now that my sons face and body are covered I had my husband spray everything this morning that resembled poison ivy.

    [​IMG]

    Now my question is how long should we wait to move the chickens outside?
     
  2. janramsey

    janramsey Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2007
    Vilonia, Arkansas
    GREAT question........Was wondering the same thing.!!! Hope we get answers very soon.....so does my hubby who is now a walkin poison ivy stalk!!
     
  3. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    Jewelweed soap is effective treatment for reducing poison ivy itch. Burt's Bees has a poison ivy soap that is good too.

    One organic method used to get rid of poison ivy is to pull it out by the roots. The roots must be disposed of; do not burn them. Inhaling the fumes from burning poison ivy causes far greater health problems than just the rash caused by skin contact.

    Another natural method is to get rid of poison ivy by smothering it. Smothering entails cutting it back close to the ground, then placing newspapers, cardboard, old carpeting, tarps, mulch or some other covering on top of it. However, be aware that, even after you kill poison ivy plants, they remain toxic. So be careful in disposing of the roots of the dead vines after pulling back the smothering agent (even if you've waited for years).

    When approaching poison ivy, try to have as little of your skin exposed as possible. All parts of it, including the roots, are poisonous so you have to be completely covered when working with it. At the very least, this means wearing gloves, long-sleeved shirt and full-length pants.

    The problem with most herbicides is that not only are they bad for your birds, they are lethal to other plants.

    Good luck!
    regards,
    keljonma

    if edited, probably for typos...
     
  4. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2007
    Northern California
    Last edited: May 8, 2007
  5. hipmarye

    hipmarye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2007
    Mississippi
    I'd like to say I was patient enough to deal with the poison ivy, but my husband already sprayed it this morning. As you see on my little boys face we were very concerned.
    [​IMG]

    The question remains, how long before we can put the chickens out in their pen? The pen is about 5 feet from where he sprayed.[​IMG]
     
  6. janramsey

    janramsey Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 21, 2007
    Vilonia, Arkansas
    I would think if he didnt spray exactly where the chicks would be it would be ok........specially if we get the rain again today!!!

    AS far as your poor baby boy...I would suggest benyedrl (spelling) by mouth and lots of calomine lotion.....if nothing else he will sleep and not itch so bad.......

    Oh and Hello from a fellow Arkansan!!
     
  7. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2007
    Northern California
    Quote:The Bentonite Clay is not for eradiating poison ivy or poison oaks but a lotion applied to dry and relieve the itch associated with it.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2007
  8. hipmarye

    hipmarye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2007
    Mississippi
    Quote:Hello fellow Arkansan. You must of gotten rain
    yesterday. It never made it south of Little Rock.
    We had lots of lightening, but not a drop of rain.

    Good to know there are others from around here. [​IMG]

    Thanks for all the suggestions every one. We are using oral Benadryl and calamine with hydrochloride and ice packs.
    I homeschool so he's playing upon my sympathy and not doing much 'school work' at all.
     
  9. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
    Quote:My 6-year-old grandson (homeschooled also by his mother) had a smiliar experience last year. He wrote me a story about how the dreaded poison ivy monster tried to conquer Earth and said grandson saved the planet! [​IMG]

    Hope your little guy is feeling better soon!

    regards,
    keljonma

    if edited, probably for typos...
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2007
  10. AccidentalFarm

    AccidentalFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2007
    Quote:My 6-year-old grandson (homeschooled also by his mother) had a smiliar experience last year. He wrote me a story about how the dreaded poison ivy monster tried to conquer Earth and said grandson saved the planet! [​IMG]

    Hope your little guy is feeling better soon!

    regards,
    keljonma

    if edited, probably for typos...

    Just a thought on the herbicide..If it does rain, consider the direction of run-off. Wouldn't want the stuff to drain towards the coop.

    My kids are also home schooled..glad to hear I'm not the only one here on BYC that does it. [​IMG] I would love to hear what ways you've integrated the chicken raising into the school work/lessons as I plan to use it in a number of different ways. (Science, economics, health..)
     

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