Question about lockdown days.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Chick1043, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Hey! I read a chick can hatch a day early if the temperature is a little higher than exposed to be. Today is day ten and it has been a little hotter than cold (for chicks I mean) through the past 10-11 days. When I candle them I can see that they are as big as exposed to be and moving around. So should I put them in lock down for four days? Or will that harm them if they don't hatch early? But if they do hatch early and I put them in lock down for three days than they would only have two days lock down. Would that harm them also? Thanks.
     
  2. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    ive never really seen a big difference between 5 days lockdown or 2 days.. some hatches come early and some come late.. like I said in the other thread temperature plays a big part in determining that.. the main thing is turning the eggs in the early stages of incubation and not having the humidity too high or too low in the early stages ... when it comes down to the last few days it doesn't matter near as much.. so if you want to go into lockdown a few days early it won't hurt anything
     
  3. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Okay, Thanks! I think I will do that than. And 1 more question! How do you know if an embryo has drowned?
     
  4. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    when a chick is at risk of drowning it's because there is liquid in the air cell.. you can usually see it when you candle ... so if there's liquid there.. you can be fairly sure that the chick will drown.. it's easy to prevent since it's caused by too high of humidity during incubation
     
  5. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glasgow, Scotland
    People say 'drowning' when they just mean their overall humidity was too high. Actual drowning (as in inhaling water and dying from lack of oxygen) only occurs when you have a fully developed chick that pips through the membrane into the air sac right before hatching, then dies because it breathes in excess fluid caused by a too high humidity days 1-18. But people use it to mean all stages of embryo death that are related to a too-high-humidity. But to confirm a proper drowning, if you poked a hole in the egg at the fat end, you would see a chick that had broken through the membrane into the air sac. Then, if you tipped the egg up, you'd get fluid dripping out of it. For other too-high-humidity related deaths, you'd just be going by the size of the air sac when you candled...
     
  6. CelticOaksFarm

    CelticOaksFarm Family owned, family run

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    Sep 7, 2009
    Florida - Space Coast
    Quote:Just making sure that you know here, but day 1 is the day AFTER the day you place the eggs in your bator. Day 18 is when you stop turning and go into lock down days 19 forward.

    Good luck with your hatch.
     
  7. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Quote:Okay, that makes a lot of sense! Thanks.
     
  8. Chick1043

    Chick1043 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 5, 2011
    Idaho
    Quote:Just making sure that you know here, but day 1 is the day AFTER the day you place the eggs in your bator. Day 18 is when you stop turning and go into lock down days 19 forward.

    Good luck with your hatch.

    Yep! Got that! Thanks.
     

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