question about setting eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Eggzactly, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. Eggzactly

    Eggzactly Chillin' With My Peeps

    180
    0
    132
    Jul 8, 2008
    marietta
    If i set my eggs in the bator at 4am is that considered day one or zero since they were put in so early in the day?
     
  2. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:Day 1 is the 24 hour period after the eggs reach 99.5.
     
  3. Chickapooh23

    Chickapooh23 Chillin' With My Peeps

    353
    0
    129
    Jan 31, 2009
    Corning OH
    If I set my eggs on a Saturday then that is day 0 and Sunday is day 1. A lot of people start with Saturday as day 1. I don't think it matters that much, just whatever makes sense to you.
     
  4. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:Yeah, it matters.

    It matters because we tell people to check their thermometers, etc, if eggs appear to hatch early or late.

    We need to be on the same page here.

    Chicken eggs hatch between 480 and 504 hours from the time they reach 99.5F That is the normal range. To give good advice we need to know how far from normal the result is, and there is only one correct way to do this.

    24 hours after achieving the right temp, day 1 ends and day 2 starts.

    After 480 hours, Day 20 ends, and the eggs then hatch on the 21st day.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Eggzactly

    Eggzactly Chillin' With My Peeps

    180
    0
    132
    Jul 8, 2008
    marietta
    Thank you everyone for your post
     
  6. Hangin Wit My Peeps

    Hangin Wit My Peeps AutumnBreezeChickens.com

    6,396
    10
    263
    Apr 20, 2008
    Birnamwood, Wisconsin
    Chicken eggs hatch between 480 and 504 hours from the time they reach 99.5F That is the normal range. To give good advice we need to know how far from normal the result is, and there is only one correct way to do this.

    Very interesting info. Twigg you seem very knowledgeable about chickens...How long have you had them and where do you learn all this info?​
     
  7. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:Very interesting info. Twigg you seem very knowledgeable about chickens...How long have you had them and where do you learn all this info?

    Well now ... some background.

    I first got involved in hatching and rearing working on a Duck farm, in the UK, for a few years in the mid-seventies. I was involved in the whole process from collecting eggs, setting in three, 4000 egg incubators, rearing chicks and shipping day-olds (lot's to Argentina)

    I was also involved in preparing the birds from live to market ready.

    Since then I have kept chickens, on and off, all my life. I have hatched chickens, ducks and geese with generally decent success.

    I have used a number of different incubators. My first was an elderly Vision still air. I bought a Brinsea Octagon 20 (my fav. which I left in the UK). I have used Hovabators and built several myself.

    The best homemade I have used is the latest on (see my sig). Last two hatches have been 100%. My wife thinks that they were 110%, she insists we set 10 eggs and got 11 chicks, but I suspect her math (and she teaches math).

    I learn. I learn from my own experience, research, and by listening to others.

    If I have a fault (er ... many, actually) it is that I do not suffer idiots very well. I do not comment on subjects that I have little or no knowledge of, nor do I ever state opinions as facts, I differentiate.

    If I see people stating opinion as fact, I have an annoying tendency to ask them to back up their assertions .... Rob and his team don't always appreciate this, and do sometimes jump in a little too quickly (my opinion, it's their site!!).

    I enjoy debate, but too many people never seemed to learn that skill, and take every counterpoint as a personal insult, which can be wearing.

    If ever you disagree with me, please feel very free to say so, you will neither annoy nor upset me [​IMG]

    So ... the point about when Day 1 starts is an interesting one. It could, I guess, seem to be a minor thing that Twigg is making a meal of. But scratch the surface and there is more to it.

    In fact it is actually very important we get it right if we are to be of any useful help to others.

    Hope this helps
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2009

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by