1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Question for serious breeders w/ rooster experience much

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jmc, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    I am considering housing my roosters completely separately from the hens. I have some nice ones that at times are a bit 'tough' on some of the girls-not mating, but picking at and chasing at times.

    I know i can do what i want and i have room to house them separately.

    So anyway, do you who are into breeding keep your roos separate?




    I may have another question or two later, but for now...............

    tx
     
  2. uncle rico

    uncle rico Chillin' With My Peeps

    277
    0
    109
    Apr 29, 2011
    Spring Green, WI
    I am planning on breeding too and plan on keeping my roos seperate from the hens. anyone out there?
     
  3. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    I have always kept my boys with their ladies...
     
  4. spiritdance

    spiritdance Chillin' With My Peeps

    864
    6
    111
    Dec 13, 2010
    I use both approaches. As long as a roo is gentle with his hens, he lives with them. If he's rough, he goes in a rooster pen, and unless he's just really special, he gets replaced with a gentler roo of equal quality as soon as possible. I hate seeing my girls picked over and scared from a rough roo, and with all the roos available out there, there's no need to put up with that. I do, however, wait until after their "teenage" period to judge my roos, since almost all of them are nothing but a bundle of raging testosterone at first. Right now, I have several bantam cochin "teenagers" separated that I hope will settle down, as well as a young Deli roo and two BR roos. All my adult roos are with their hens, but I also have enough hens for them. I think that's the key (enough hens) with larger breeds that are prone to do damage when breeding.
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,447
    2,066
    456
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Some of my breeding involves keeping eggs of hens separate from other hens. One method to achieve this is to rotate rooster between pens used to house hens individually. Hens covered every third day have fertility as high as hens being covered 10 times daily. Easier on hens as well but more work for me. Alternative method is to secure rooster with tie cord. Hens can then control proximity to rooster and mating frequency as well.
     
  6. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    Quote:i wonder what your ratio of boys to girls is, though. i am not about to keep four boys with just 20 girls.


    BTW, my birds are 12 weeks old monday june 27
     
  7. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    Quote:thanks, 'chid'. i know you are one serious breeder too.
     
  8. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    Quote:thanks. i like your approach. i would consider teenage to end around 24 wks. (that is playing it safe)

    what about you?

    There are roos always to be found--sort of. but not always the type/breed you are looking for or working with..................
     
  9. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:i wonder what your ratio of boys to girls is, though. i am not about to keep four boys with just 20 girls.


    BTW, my birds are 12 weeks old monday june 27

    I go by 1 roo for each 10 hens.. unless they are a breed like marans.. who i believe are 1 roo for 8 hens
    I have tried 1 roo for 15 hens.. but the fertility dropped too much for my liking

    So if you're going for hatching eggs.. I would go with the breed recommendation or 1 roo for 10
    if you're not going for hatching rates then you could add more hens for less roos (like 1 roo for 15 or 20 hens)
     
  10. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

    5,532
    181
    273
    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    I set a high priority on temperament. If a rooster savages his hens or attacks people, he's headed for the stew pot, no matter how pretty he is. Looks aren't everything.

    When I had chickens, the rooster was with the hens full time. He was quite the gentleman and very alert in the care of his flock.

    Now I have ducks and geese and if anyone is a savage, then it is off with his head. I won't have it, and temperament is one of the things that is inherited.

    The ganders must be good fathers and defend their goslings with their life, but they must not attack their human family. Yes, they can do that.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by