Question for those of you who sell fertile eggs

Discussion in 'Geese' started by nsanywhere, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. nsanywhere

    nsanywhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    124
    1
    111
    Jan 8, 2010
    Very happy with my successful hatch! Now I know I have a good breeding pair, but I also don't need 9823709847 geese :)

    So rather than just toss the eggs, I'm thinking about selling them. They are Sebastopol, all white.

    For those of you who sell your eggs:

    Do you sell online? eBay, or other places?

    How do you ship them?

    Do you get them started, candle, then sell, or just sell straight from the nest in breeding season?

    Do you offer money back if it doesn't hatch? Breaks? etc.?

    Any advice would be appreciated!
     
  2. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

    2,433
    29
    238
    Apr 9, 2007
    I haven't sold Goose eggs yet but I've sold and shipped chicken and duck eggs, here on the BYC "Buy, Sell, Auction." I make sure they are fertile first, either by hatching babies from them or just cracking some eggs and making sure there's a bulls eye on the yokes. I don't start the eggs- I collect them from the nest(s) until I have enough. I write the date on the tops of the eggs each day, don't wash them, wipe or brush off any dirt able to come off, and store them on the kitchen counter in egg cartons propped up one way then tilted the other way, back and forth, until someone buys them. I then wrap each egg in bubble wrap, and either wrap them all into a big piece of big bubble wrap or put them in an egg carton and cover them up with bubble wrap, packing peanuts, cotton batting, whatever I have that day to give them extra padding and protection. I make sure they can't move around in the box before I tape it shut. I ship priority mail with delivery confirmation, after paypal payment is received.
    Hope that helps [​IMG]
    Lisa
    I can't control how the PO treats them, so I don't do money back- but will always try to help the buyer out if the box/eggs get ruined by the PO. If I have more eggs, I always try to send them more for a reduced price.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,381
    37
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    I haven't shipped goose eggs but I've received several. The best way to sell them (to get the best return) is by listing them on Ebay. BYC is good, don't get me wrong, but there is a lot more traffic there. As for shipping, this is the best advice I can give. I've received several goose eggs shipments that had broken eggs. You cannot package them like chicken eggs. I can't stress this enough. I've recently received 2 shipments that were wrapped like chicken eggs (small-bubble bubble wrap, ends of eggs not covered, stacked on top of each other in the box). The first problem with this was the small bubble wrap--way too small for goose eggs. Second is leaving the ends open, this gives them absolutely no protection from breakage. Granted, the sides are the most vulnerable, but with the weight of goose eggs they really need to be covered.

    So the best method for shipping is:
    1) Order some #7 boxes from USPS. These are the biggest boxes that USPS offers and 9 times of 10 they will be cheaper than any flat rate box.

    2) Order some medium flat rate boxes from USPS. These you will use as your 'inside' box if you choose to double box them.

    (Note: Both are free with free shipping on the USPS website links given)

    3) Buy some large-bubble bubble wrap. This would be the 1/2" bubble size available at most office supply stores and Wal-Mart.

    4) Collect some newspapers to use for packing materials.

    5) Take an entire sheet of bubble wrap (12" x 12") and wrap the egg. Make sure you cover all sides of the eggs!!

    6) Crumple the newspaper to make a good layer of padding in the bottom of the box.

    7) Place one egg in the box on its side and surround it with paper.

    8) Continue packing the box one egg at a time, surrounding each with newspaper, until you've filled the box.

    9) Fill the remainder of the box with crumpled paper.

    **Make sure that none of the eggs touch each other, the sides, or the top/bottom of the box. This is how they break. If you decide to double box them you can use less paper in the inside box and surround the inside box with paper instead.


    Again, I strongly recommend using the large-bubble bubble wrap!
     
  4. The Duck ABC's

    The Duck ABC's Chillin' With My Peeps

    516
    13
    121
    Feb 5, 2011
    I sell duck eggs on ebay and do have a egg breakage refund policy. Here is a link to one so you get an idea:
    Duck Egg Listing
    The post office has regional A and B boxes and they are even cheaper then the flat rate priority rates. These boxes are only available to commercial shippers. Endicia users also have access to those rates.
    I use egg cartons, which they also make for goose eggs. See www.eggcartons.com
    This keeps the eggs in place and prevents them from hitting each other. Plus the cartons have air slots, which lets the eggs breath. I do not use bubble wrap, because it does suffocate and weakens the eggs. Leaving the bubble wrap open on their ends does also help, but again I do not use it. I do wrap Kleenex tissues around the eggs so they will not move within the egg carton. I need to do that with duck eggs, because the carton is also designed for turkey eggs so there is a little bit of space. I set the egg carton into pine shaving into the box. They keep it snug and tight and does not allow shifting. Pine shavings insulate, shock absorb and catch any possible leaks. My breakage rate is 1%, or 1 out of 100 eggs. They are usually not broken, but only show hair line cracks. Many fix them up with wax and still hatch babies out of them, they still get a refund on those eggs. So far I have only happy customers with my policy.
     
  5. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,381
    37
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    The regional rate boxes wouldn't be deep enough for goose eggs in my opinion. Also, wrapping the egg completely does not harm them. I've sent several batches of eggs, all wrapped completely, with several reports of 100% or near 100% fertility/development. I ship chicken, duck, guinea, and quail eggs all the time.

    ETA: I can't remember the last time someone reported back to me with receiving broken eggs.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
  6. The Duck ABC's

    The Duck ABC's Chillin' With My Peeps

    516
    13
    121
    Feb 5, 2011
    Everyone has different ways. I only showed mine as an example, in the long run you need to find your own way. Good point with the regional A box. Didn't think of the large egg size, since I only ship duck eggs.
     
  7. nsanywhere

    nsanywhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    124
    1
    111
    Jan 8, 2010
    SO much good information - thanks everyone!!

    Another question.....

    How long can you keep the eggs before they go bad? For example, I have 2 laid in the nest now, but she's just getting started (based on previous egg clutches).

    Do you sell/ship weekly with whatever you have? Or is there another way to collect your stock, so to speak? :)

    How long can the eggs sit around before they must be incubated or tossed?
     
  8. nsanywhere

    nsanywhere Chillin' With My Peeps

    124
    1
    111
    Jan 8, 2010
    Quote:Thanks Lisa - very helpful! Just to clarify, when you describe tilting the eggs, are you doing this daily? Is it a similar principal to turning the eggs in the 'bator? Why the tilting?

    I'm a little nervous about the kitchen counter with my 3 cats :) Is a protected shelf in the basement ok, or is that potentially too damp/cool?
     
  9. The Duck ABC's

    The Duck ABC's Chillin' With My Peeps

    516
    13
    121
    Feb 5, 2011
    I have only duck eggs, but it is the same for goose eggs according to Holderread. You can store up to 2 weeks before they fertility will weaken in the eggs. You also have to consider shipping time, so collecting over the week is fine. I store mine in a shallow rubbermaid container (16x24") with pine shavings and the lid on it. The lid is not airtight and the pine shavings hold moisture so the eggs do not overdry in our dry climate. Sometimes I place a small mason jar inside of it to keep the humidity higher. You don't need to worry about the moisture if you live in a climate with humidity. I try to keep mine around 40% humidity. I live in the high dessert mountain region of Oregon. It's very dry up here and no rain either. The eggs are placed into the shaving with the tip slightly downwards. I turn them daily, and there is no need to turn them more often in the storage collection time frame.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by