Question : How to combine drugs for respiratory issues

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by pee-ridge chick, Nov 2, 2016.

  1. pee-ridge chick

    pee-ridge chick Out Of The Brooder

    We have a mixed flock of layers 8 mo old. Have had no problems with them until recently. We had a torrential rainfall a few weeks ago when the hurricane passed by. The henhouse was flooded pretty bad. The chickens stayed soaked for days even thou they had plenty of cover, but rain really doesn't seem to phase them.

    Here in North Carolina the fall weather changes from 40's to 80's and back again, there's never time to adjust. I've been hearing several hens sneezing, and seen a few wet beaks. I want to treat the whole flock at once. I remember reading somewhere that using Erythromycin (Gallimycin) in combination with Sulfamethazine (generic Sulmet) is a very good treatment for respiratory issues. Does anyone have experience with these in combination? Would I use both drugs at full strength, or a lowered dosage? I have both of these on hand. I live in a remote area with no access to a sympathetic Vet. Anything else would need to be ordered online so that would mean 7 to 10 days before I could start treatment. Any help would certainly be appreciated.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Respiratory diseases in chickens can be caused by bacteria or mycoplasma, viruses, or fungus from moldy wet conditions. Antibiotics and sulfa drugs would only treat bacteria or mycoplasma. It would be best to get a couple tested through your local extension agent, state vet, or poultry lab. If you haven't recently added new birds or been exposed to outside birds, I would hold off to get testing, and observe symptoms. Keep good air circulation overhead in your coop, clean dry bedding, prevent wet spots, and keep temperatures from getting too hot inside. Many of the oral antibiotics will shortly be off the market in feed stores by the first of 2017. Tylan 50 injectable given orally or by injection 1 ml per 5 pounds twice a day for 3-5 days is a good one to use for MG and coryza. Knowing what you are treating, or culling sick birds may be the best treatment. If you lose one, get a necropsy done by your state vet which can tell what disease(s) is present.
     
  3. pee-ridge chick

    pee-ridge chick Out Of The Brooder

    Is it possible for medicine to have a negative affect or allergic reaction? It's been 2 weeks since my original post. I've been observing them carefully and there are no new symptoms. Just the occasional sneeze, or/and cough,occasional clear discharge from the nose. Yesterday I treated them all with soluble Tylan at 1tsp. per gallon. This morning I have one severely depressed pullet. She just sat in the hen house after everyone else had left. Head down, feathers fluffed, and just let me walk over and pick her up. She is an Ancona and is usually high energy and flighty. On the poop board beneath her we're 5 or 6 poops that were butter yellow and liquidy. Not frothy. Everyone else had normal poops. I scrap my boards every day and wash them once a month. Any ideas what it is?
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
  4. pee-ridge chick

    pee-ridge chick Out Of The Brooder

    She died in my arms not 10 minutes after I posted. I'm on my way now to the State lab for a necropsy. I'll post results when I get them.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I doubt if the Tylan would have caused her problems. She may just have succumbed to whatever is going on. Coccidiosis can be a common problem, and causes runny or bloody poops, sleepiness, not eating, and hunched posture. E coli is also a common secondary infection in sick chickens. When treating with antibiotics, I would recommend following up with some plain yogurt for probiotics, and they can be given at the same time. Sorry for your loss, and hopefully the rest will recover. Since many respiratory diseases can be caused by viruses or fungus that antibiotics won't help, it is helpful to try and identify what disease that is present. Let us know what the nexropsy results are if you can.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016
  6. pee-ridge chick

    pee-ridge chick Out Of The Brooder

    Thank you for your kind understanding, you are right, Tylan had nothing to do with her death.

    The Doctor at the lab called with his findings. Sis was not being affected by whatever respiratory problem is going around. She had several large masses on her Liver. Plus her Bursa was enlarged, and she had Peritonitis. He suspects Lymphoid Leukosis. NOT what I was wanting to hear. He sent off tissue samples for confirmation, he also sent off samples for the respiratory problem even thou she showed no sign of it. She more than likely had been exposed to it.

    He was such a kind man and took so much time to explain everything to me. He's retiring next month, I hope his replacement is half as kind. All this for $30. Even though it was over 100 miles round trip, it is good to finally know. Waiting for culture results for confirmation. I'm fairly confident in his diagnosis, he's been doing it a lot of years.

    He also told me an interesting thing. In this area at least, whenever a chicken is brought in for respiratory problems, 90% of the time it is MG. So the rest of my babies will continue on with the Tylan treatment.

    Thanks for your help eggcessive. RIP my beautiful 'Little Sister'. We're going to miss you. She was an Ancona.

    'Buff Buff' overlooking his flock.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Thank you for the update on the necropsy, and sorry to hear about the lymphoid leukosis. I have only read about it, but it can be a common cause of tumors and lack of immunity. It may be more common in chickens, but most people are not able to afford the cost of necropsy, which can be up to $200 in some states. You are lucky to have such a nice vet at the poultry lab, and by sharing the info on MG and the low cost for necropsy, really helps others. Take care.
     

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