question on Ameraucana mix chicks

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by nikkers390, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. nikkers390

    nikkers390 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Someone gave me a bunch of mixed chicks. Father was purebred white Ameraucana mother a Rhode Island Red mix.
    13 of them are mostly white/splash and one is a buff with a white head. One looks light blue splash or maybe just a dingy white? Legs are white, pink or grey. Some have pea comb, some have single combs. They are different ages from 3 months to 6 weeks. Hyper little guys and in my opinion ugly little chicks.
    My question is what color eggs will the pullets lay? Does the blue color gene get passed down to the female chicks from the male? Does comb matter? How about leg color.
    Newbie here. I could use a little help.
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  2. Manningjw

    Manningjw Chillin' With My Peeps


    If the father was a pure bred Ameraucana 100% of the chicks should have pea combs because it is dominant. Also 100% should lay a greenish color egg because blue shells are dominant over white then brown covers that to make it green. Generally speaking pea comb is linked to blue eggs because of position on the chromosome of the two gene.
     
  3. nikkers390

    nikkers390 Chillin' With My Peeps

    If the father was a pure bred Ameraucana 100% of the chicks should have pea combs because it is dominant. Also 100% should lay a greenish color egg because blue shells are dominant over white then brown covers that to make it green. Generally speaking pea comb is linked to blue eggs because of position on the chromosome of the two gene.
    Manningjw

    Thank you for your input. Since the chicks were gifts, I did not question too closely. I will keep an eye on them and just keep the pullets.
    They were not in the best condition since the previous owner started and continued feeding the babies cracked corn. I hope they will feather out nicely now that I have them on chick starter. Regardless, they are very active and curious. It may just be the "tween" age, but they are surely some scraggly chicks.
     

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