question re: young Iowa Blues

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard o' started by farmert, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. farmert

    farmert Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I posted on general discussion and a response sent me to this forum. Very interesting info that I'm learning re: IBs

    Just bought three seven-month old Iowa Blues. Asked for hens only since we already have a rooster (Copper Maran beauty). Noticed, however, that two of the birds have no comb to speak of while one of them has a full comb and wattle (didn't check the ear).

    Does anyone know if the fully-developed comb is a rooster? We need to know as soon as possible since we cannot have another rooster and agreed to pay for three hens.

    I'd love to be able to help continue this breed, but we don't have the set up for it.

    If there is any other way to ID the chicken with the full comb to determine sex, please let me know.

    Thank you.
     
  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Post pics and we should be able to help you.
     
  3. farmert

    farmert Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All hens or two hens and rooster?


    I was told all three were born between mid-March and mid-May. Even though the photos don't show it, they all look pretty much the same size. Red comb may be a tad larger.

    If that photo is not good enough, I can try again.
     
  4. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    All females. Males have a more uneven, patchy coloring.
     
  5. farmert

    farmert Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hurray! Thanks.
     
  6. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All females, the two with "no" combs are not 7 months old. More likely closer to 5- 5 1/2 months.
     
  7. farmert

    farmert Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gray Farms -- thanks for that information. I meant to ask if there could be a difference in ages. Do you know how old they are when the comb is fully formed? The one with the comb isn't laying, or at least not yet. She could be stressed from the move, but none of them seem upset. They just eased in to the situation like they had been here all along.

    None of the other hens appear interested in them. The guineas are interested, but they check out everyone and everything.
     
  8. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All of my Iowa Blue pullets seem to get their full combs around 6.5-7 months and start laying soon there after. So I'd say she's just getting ready to lay. As soon as she gets settled in that is.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2016
  9. farmert

    farmert Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, I'm glad to learn that. If you have any other tips about them, I'm all ears. They seem to be settling in very well. They will probably join the rest of the crew tomorrow or Monday.
     
  10. Gray Farms

    Gray Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Iowa Blues are a great layer. They don't lay the biggest eggs, probably like a "medium" egg you'd get from the grocery store. The eggs can range from white to a dark cream color. They lay very well in winter as well. And they tend to go broody in late summer so you'll have to watch for that. They aren't the tamest breed either. I mean they generally tolerate you in their pen but strangers tend to upset them and they'll get wound up. They are also very good fliers so you'll have to clip wings or a cover the pen to keep them in. Iowa Blue roosters are typically very docile. I have two in my breeder pen and several in the grow out pens with lots of other cockerels and they very rarely fight.
     

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