Questions about Duck eggs

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by lauren2k, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. lauren2k

    lauren2k New Egg

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    Hello everyone! I am kind of new to the duck world and am still learning everything there is to know about ducks. I purchased two ducklings from my work last spring, a pekin and a khaki campbell. I have recently discovered that the pekin is a male and the campbell is a female. Now I am really excited about having eggs! Also, I have noticed that they have started mating as well! I would like to sell ducks eggs for consumption, and I would also like to try selling some for hatching. She hasn't started laying yet, so this is the perfect time for me to do my research and hear from others on what I need to do to be prepared. One of my main questions would be is there anything special I need to do for the eggs I would like to sell for hatching? And what about the eggs I want to sell for consumption? I'm assuming most of her eggs will be fertilized considering the mating that is taking place.

    I am open for all the advice I can be given! Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Welcome to the Duck Forum!

    I hope the Pekin drake is not too rough on the Khaki, which is smaller. Watch out for signs of injury. Some drakes are nice, some can get mean when they mate.

    The first several weeks of eggs may be fertile but may not be as robust, so many people do not try to hatch them. Just gather the egg each day and refrigerate it for eating.

    I will let more experienced hatchers check in about handling hatching eggs. Please keep us updated!
     
  3. Mrs. Fluffy Puffy

    Mrs. Fluffy Puffy Fluffy Feather Farm

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    Are you wanting to sell hatching eggs, hatch out ducklings and sell them, or both?

    Since your duck eggs will be mixed you will not be able to get as much for them. I sell mixed ducklings in my area for $8.00 each, I usually sell hatching eggs for $3.00 = $4.00 each, if they are mixed. More if they're pure.

    Hope this helps...

    ~ Aspen
     
  4. myfinefeatheredfriends

    myfinefeatheredfriends Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you sell them, take them straight from the nest to a fresh egg carton. If they are dirty since ducks are natural mudders, DO NOT WASH THEM! You would be eliminating the protective covering around the egg allowing bacteria to enter through the pores in the shell thus contaminating the egg. Only wash and refrigerate the eggs you plan to eat. DO NOT PUT HATCHING EGGS IN THE FRIDGE! Leave the hatching eggs out in a carton at room temperature and turn them a couple times a day til they are sold. And lastly only ship eggs that were laid within a maximum of 4 days otherwise it may affect the buyer's hatch rate, which won't look good on your reputation. Hope this helps!
     
  5. lauren2k

    lauren2k New Egg

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    Jan 2, 2013
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    Thanks for the replies!!

    Amiga: So far the khaki seems to be just fine. I check her every day and she shows no signs of injury or being hurt. And yes, I've heard the first eggs aren't the best, so I will keep that in mind! Thank you! I will keep everyone updated!

    Mrs. Fluffy Puffy: I am wanting to attempt to hatch a few for myself in an incubator and I would like to sell hatching eggs along with eggs for consumption. Okay thank you for the prices! I didn't realize how much per egg you could get for fertile eggs meant for hatching.

    myfinefeatheredfriend: Okay wow I did not know any of that information. Thank you so much, this info is extremely helpful.
     
  6. fowl farm

    fowl farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fun! Once she decides to go broody on a nest, she'll keep it really clean. Do you free range? Keep in mind she might decide to lay somewhere other than her house, so keep an eye out. You might want to start keeping them in a little later in the morning when she reaches laying age around 5-7 months. Another way of telling is just watching her behavior. One of my ducks spent a week of wandering and making nests in the ground before laying in her house. The other one laid two eggs in the house out of the blue and then refused to lay anywhere but outside. If she does lay outside, let her keep an egg or two in the nest or she'll find a new place to lay where you won't find it for 2 weeks (stupid ducks!) Good luck, ducks rock.
     
  7. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    You have gotten some good advice. The only thing that I will add is that it will be hard for you to sell both hatching eggs and eating eggs since you only have the one hen. You will only be getting one egg a day, 7 a week at most since sometimes they skip a day. Most eating eggs are sold in packs of 6 or 12 so they will be over a week old if someone wants a dozen. Not that a 12 day old egg is old, especially when compared to store bought. Usually hatching eggs are sold in the same 6 or 12 amounts and with hatching eggs, fresh eggs are a must.

    Something to consider. I'm not trying to bring down your idea. [​IMG] I would try incubating your own first that way you can have an idea of hatch rate and fertility which will help when selling hatching eggs. Also, decide what you will do with ducklings once they arrive. Will you keep them, try to sell etc. Not everyone will want to buy mixed ducks so something to keep in mind.
     
  8. lauren2k

    lauren2k New Egg

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    Jan 2, 2013
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    fowl farm: Thanks for the advice and sharing your experience! I let them free range whenever I am home, but for the most part they are kept in a wire enclosure. On the days that I am home they could be out for hours, so I should probably keep an eye out for an egg or two when she starts laying. Other than those few days I should be able to find her eggs easily.

    jdywntr: I appreciate your thoughts! These are ideas I haven't thought of myself. I do want to see how things go before I actually start selling any kind of eggs, hatching or eating. I don't want a lot of ducklings and I don't plan on selling ducklings, but I would like at least one offspring. I'm just not sure how many I should incubate; I could have more ducklings on my hands than I would like if all goes well! Do you have any advice on how many I should incubate if I really don't want more than two ducklings? Also, do you think buyers would be hesitant to buy a dozen eggs that are over a week old? Once again, I have never sold eggs or bought fresh eggs from anyone so I am a newbie!


    I did have some other questions:
    1. When should I expect her to stary laying?
    2: Is there a good place to get egg cartons besides just buying eggs at the grocery store and using that carton? Also, will duck eggs fit inside a regular egg carton?
     
  9. fowl farm

    fowl farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can usually buy egg cartons at places that sell feed and chicks. And yes, a duck will fit in a regular chicken egg carton.
     

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