Questions about large duck eggs in a circulated air LG and old model LG turner

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by AprilAWZ, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. AprilAWZ

    AprilAWZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 28, 2007
    northeastern MN
    After a three year break, I decided that I wanted to hatch some new chicks and ducklings, so I broke out the LGs, fired them up, and all's going pretty nicely, Except for the duck eggs. Now, I've hatched ducks in the LG with the older, finger-cup style turners without a problem, but they were little KC eggs. Now, I have these massive Saxony eggs that keep wanting to (an too often, successfully) roll out of the cups. Any suggestions on how to keep the buggers in, or do I have to switch to a different turner altogether?
     
  2. AprilAWZ

    AprilAWZ Chillin' With My Peeps

    109
    1
    128
    Nov 28, 2007
    northeastern MN
    Thanks for the replies, everyone!! [​IMG] Jk....I did figure it out pretty quickly, but in my defense, I didn't have my coffee this morning, so I wasn't exactly firing on all eight when I posed the question. But anyway, I thought I'd thow it up here just in case someone has the same problem in the future.

    I took a fairly sturdy rubber band, slid it under the actual cup, between the metal rail and the underside of the cup. I set the egg in the cup, and stretched the rubber band over the top of the egg. Slicker than snot on a doorknob, and pretty inexpensive, too...at least cheaper than a new turner or rails, and less hassle than resetting cups.

    Since I'm already here, I'll add a few more observations about duck eggs in a throwback LG turner. The KC eggs were pretty much like hatching large chicken eggs, but the biiiig heavy breed eggs need to be set in an alternating pattern if you, like me, do not want to rearrange the cups before setting the eggs. You can comfortably fit about 20-22 big eggs in the turner, but you will likely need to secure them.

    And some non-turner LG ideas... to keep humidity up without opening up the incubator, I run a piece of aquarium air line through one of the vent holes, and thread it through the screen into the water channels. In the duck 'bator and hatcher, I use a liner so that I can put water in throughout the bottom of the incubator, increasing its surface area, and as a result the RH. When you shut the incubator, you'll want to take up the slack so it doesn't get wound up the the eggs/turner. I use a 50 cc syringe (pick these up at any farm supply store) inserted into the outside end of the air hose to add water to the channels/bottom of the incubator/hatcher. The nice thing about the syringe is that you can really micromanage the water, adding a little at a time. As a result, you'll not find yourself taking apart the set-up to dump water because your windows are fogging up when you're only trying to keep it at 50%...ahem...I heard this can happen.[​IMG]

    That's all I got for now...happy hatching!
     

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