questions about merging my 2 goslings groups

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by chickenlisa, Mar 31, 2009.

  1. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    This afternoon- we put the 3 '1 week old' Pilgrim Goslings (all females- Prissy, Pandora, and Porsche) ) in the brooder box that has the 4 '3 week old' Pilgrim goslings ( Penelope, Petie, Paulie, and Paco) 2 of the boys actually hissed and pulled the fuzz on the necks of the babies. The other boy and Penelope pretty much ignored the babies. The babies didn't get too upset. They ran around and stayed together. My daughter couldn't stand watching the older boys doing that. She took out 1 boy at a time and held him and pet him and just reassured him that he was ok, but as soon as she put that boy back and took out another boy, the 1st one would resume hissing and go after the babies. We put the babies back in their own half of the stock tank...Will this behavior dwindle as they get used to being with each other, and as the younger ones grow larger and older? I was worried about this, that's why I wanted Ideal to hurry up and reship the females as soon as possible. They did do a great job, and I'm happy with them. I'm just worried about the 3 baby girls being accepted by the 2 week older youngsters.
    I also didn't think Pilgrims ever hissed. ???
    Lisa
     
  2. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    we tried again today- and the big boys just hissed and grabbed the little ones. What can we do? Just keep trying? I sure hope they stop this and accept them soon! I'm running out of room- they are getting big!
     
  3. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    When they are separated, can they still see each other?
     
  4. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    not now. Its a cardboard divider. Would it help if it was wire or plexi-glass?
     
  5. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    I would try wire. That way they can see and smell and talk to each other.
     
  6. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    will do that. Thanks!
     
  7. eggchel

    eggchel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Yes, you can try dividing them with wire, but honestly, if you just leave them together overnight they will probably sort it out and accept each other.


    chel
     
  8. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    That was easy! Thanks! I had an adjustable window screen covering part of the top of 1 brooder box. I just took that and fit it in the big stock tank and taped it in place...my other window screens cover all the brooders fine without that little one. (I have 3 cats and even tho they act afraid of the chicks and goslings when we introduce them, I don't trust them at all.)
    I'll let them be like that overnight and during the day tomorrow (I work until 3) then put them together for awhile more. Hope this works!
    Thanks again! I'm not good at thinking up solutions myself- I can copy anything once someone else thinks it up! [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  9. chickenlisa

    chickenlisa Invincible Summer

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    Quote:I'm so afraid to do that right now- I'm not willing to risk finding a dead baby gosling. Would/could they do that? I'm so new to geese.
     
  10. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Quote:I'm so afraid to do that right now- I'm not willing to risk finding a dead baby gosling. Would/could they do that? I'm so new to geese.

    Yes they might (you can never be sure with geese) I had one Pilgrim gander gosling that I named The Klansman that I had to seperate since he would try to beat the darker ones to death. Geese are flock animals, he didn't like being isolated, if he was good the other gosllings could approach and socialize with him. When he was nasty they just went to the other end of the brooder and left him alone until he could call them back again. It took three days of isolation before I would risk even trial intergration but it seemed to take finally and while he was never a gentle gander he learned enough to get along with the ladies...~gd
     

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