Questions about sebbies

Discussion in 'Geese' started by daze333, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    Hi,
    I would love to get some sebbie geese. I understand that they have to be kept separate from chickens and dogs. I have met a few and they were very friendly. Here are my questions;
    Are they all friendly? Or do you instill this in them when young?
    If you have multiple ganders in a small flock, will they fight like roosters?
    Do they eat a lot compared to chickens?
    How much space do they need?
    How many eggs do they lay approx in a year? And how many are fertile?
    Are their eggs difficult to hatch?

    I have done a lot of searching on BYC for this info and couldn't find definitive answers, so please forgive me if they are duplicates.

    Thank you for your help.
     
  2. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

    4,203
    74
    253
    Apr 19, 2009
    Most of these are just goose issues, not necessarily unique to any one breed so I'll give them a shot... [​IMG]

    Quote:Why?

    Are they all friendly? Or do you instill this in them when young?

    Are you confusing friendliness with docility? Some breeds -- like sebbies -- are known for being relatively docile. That is, they're less likely to be aggressive. There are individuals in any breed that will not follow the rules of the breed but for the most part if you buy a docile breed you are more likely to receive docile birds. Friendliness, is an entirely different ballgame. It's much more likely, from what I've observed, when geese are kept as singles than even in a small gaggle. Geese, when they have other geese are not what I would describe as "friendly". They're curious, they're inquisitive, but they're not, as a general rule, friendly.

    If you have multiple ganders in a small flock, will they fight like roosters?

    They can, yes. See this post I made a while back about two of my ganders fighting -- presumably over another gander, no less -- https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=420713

    Do they eat a lot compared to chickens?

    Relative to their size, no. If you have plenty of grass and weeds for them to forage they eat even less. I wouldn't recommend keeping them without grass, personally.

    How much space do they need?

    As much as you can possibly give them.

    How many eggs do they lay approx in a year?

    No personal experience with Sebbies, but check out this chart: http://www.metzerfarms.com/GooseBreedComparison.cfm

    And how many are fertile?

    That'll depend on your individual geese and setup. Water for breeding on helps improve fertility in most cases. Best gander to goose ratios vary, with sebbies being a lighter breed you should be able to get away with more geese per gander though, for instance.
    Are their eggs difficult to hatch?

    HTH! [​IMG]
     
  3. ChickenHwk

    ChickenHwk Out Of The Brooder

    95
    1
    41
    Jul 31, 2010
    Rayland, Ohio
    I have been keeping my Sebbies with my chickens and they have been doing fine but I plan to build a seperate pen for them when the weather breaks...

    In my expierence with sebastopols, the ganders are more "pushy" towards humans than the geese, but I haven't had nearly enough experience with sebastopols to give you definite answers...
     
  4. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

    16,242
    107
    336
    Oct 19, 2009
    Forks, WA
    Ditto on the goose issues. Any "issues" a Sebastopol has is not a breed thing, it's a goose thing.


    In general, Sebbies are much more friendly than one would imagine a goose. I've never met a mean Sebastopol, and even a scared one won't bite much if at all.

    As for the dogs and chickens rule - To me, it is fine if they're with dogs and chickens just as long as they get to know that both those animals are a part of the group, not intruders. Also, it is very wise to keep the chicken feed out of reach and to allow chickens a place to hide in case the geese feel like biting or chasing them. (They will do that.)

    As for the multiple ganders thing, no, if they're raised together it goes the SAME for roosters - I've got several roosters together, getting along great, just as I have a couple ganders together, getting along great.

    They eat a lot, but they aren't omnivores like chickens, so they'll settle quite well with grasses and other greenery.

    They don't need a LOT of space, but a green area to roam and a pool are, in my opinion, required/recommended.


    As for the eggs, fertility, and hatching - I have no experience in that yet. But I do know they're seasonal, and don't lay much except around the spring time.
     
  5. Jenifer Kraus

    Jenifer Kraus Chillin' With My Peeps

    223
    0
    89
    Jun 16, 2010
    Kansas
    I have some old sebastopol girls that sleep with turkeys , ducks and few chickens . They are let out everyday. I think you will sure enjoy sebastopols.
     
  6. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    First recommendation, do not overly imprint goslings. In breeding season even a nice gander can get pushy or aggressive when the females are laying or trying to set eggs. It's instinct, they are trying to be a protective 'father' and increase the chances of their genes passing on. If the gander is not as familiar with you he will usually respect your space more. Outside of breeding season I have rarely had problems with any gander, but during breeding season it is a whole different ballgame.

    There are people who tell you how sebastopols never bite, sebastopols never this never that.... well,..I will never take a child, supervised or not, in with my geese during breeding season. Although often there aren't any problems, occasionally they grab pantlegs, pinch, chase, or flog you with wings. These aren't banties, geese are powerful birds. Not trying to discourage you- I love geese. I really enjoy watching them graze, they come when I call them (despite none being handled a lot or imprinted when young) and are very entertaining to watch. Lots of personality, more intelligent than chickens, and have definite family/group dynamics.

    That said, they are very protective of young and potential young.
     
  7. Mrs. Turbo

    Mrs. Turbo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 26, 2009
    ky
    our kids can't go into the field during breeding season. The ganders do go after them to bite and the kids run screaming.
     
  8. daze333

    daze333 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 26, 2008
    Port Angeles, WA
    Everyone-thank you for all the info! That was helpful.
    I think this answers my questions!
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2010
  9. TennesseeTruly

    TennesseeTruly Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 5, 2009
    Church Hill, TN
    Mrs. Turbo :

    our kids can't go into the field during breeding season. The ganders do go after them to bite and the kids run screaming.

    Same with our grandson, Rebecca. He can't go into any of the goose pens during breeding season. The ganders bully him. The rest of the year, its okay.​
     
  10. DaveK

    DaveK Chillin' With My Peeps

    357
    9
    100
    Jun 19, 2010
    Quote:This is all very good advice in my book. My nicest, friendliest and most social ganders can be awful during the breeding season. No polite little nips and "please go away from her nest" but all out attack by something that makes you remember that these things used to be pretty bad ass reptiles. Not meant to discourage anyone but when "the internet says" a lot that isn't true it may cause unrealistic expectations. [email protected] www.sebastopols.freeforums.org
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by