Questions for the DIY painters..veneer cabinets?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by ChickenDreamer, Mar 13, 2009.

  1. ChickenDreamer

    ChickenDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2008
    Northern Ontario
    So the spring cleaning bug has bit pretty hard here the last few days, and I've made it to the kitchen. I've already decided the walls and ceiling need a fresh coat of paint and I've washed them down with TSP in preperation. Things are looking brighter already!

    The problem is the cabinets. Firstly, I live in a rental so replacement is not an option (even assuming I could afford that lol).
    The cabinets are a horrid 1980s Darkest brown veneer/laminate (is there a difference?).

    I've done some reading on the net and have an early plan to wash with TSP, sand surfaces, re-wash. Prime then paint.

    Has anyone had experience with painting this type of surface? What did you do/use? What were the results? Would you do it again?

    I've heard that melamine paints are a nightmare and I'd like to avoid those. I personally like the durability of oil paint, if I can make it work on this surface.

    I just can't afford to make the landlord's cabinets worse than the dingy horror they already are!

    Any and all advise appreciated. [​IMG]

    Regards,
    Angela.
     
  2. conradpdx

    conradpdx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2009
    On my couch
    Sanding and priming is a must on painting a veneered surface.

    Oil paint is a better option over acrylic. It's more durable and less likely to chip. however it has a much longer drying time, and is more expensive.

    But personally, if you get away from using the cabinets for a week I think the oils are well worth the higher price. \\

    But don't skimp on the priming when you do this, two coats are even better than one. And hitting the primer with a little light sandpaper between coats (after it's dried) is also a good idea for a smooth finish. Proper priming is the key to a great painting job.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2009
  3. Up-the-Creek

    Up-the-Creek Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 16, 2008
    West Virginia
    Quote:Agree 100%. I had cabinets in another house and that is what I did, sanded,primed,sanded again and used oil paint. Well worth the time. I lived there for 12 years and never had the first chip and looked nice the whole time. The cabinets i did was those yucky veneered seventy cabinets. [​IMG]
     
  4. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    I have used these methods before with good results, I am a contractor so when I do this I try to stay away from poor quality paints and very light colors as they tend to yellow or fade over time. Do not buy Behr Paint's at home depot for this as they are very difficult to work with in this application, a good paint will be the measure of your success. you have a good plan good luck.


    AL
     
  5. The Chicken Lady

    The Chicken Lady Moderator Staff Member

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    Apr 21, 2008
    West Michigan
    Just a thought... You rent. Are you allowed to paint your cabinets?

    If I did that where I live, we'd be in so much trouble!
     
  6. ChickenDreamer

    ChickenDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2008
    Northern Ontario
    Thanks for you replies. It's good to hear that this can be done!
    I believe I will go with oil paint and primer.

    As to quality of paint, does price equal quality? Can you recommend good brands to use?
     
  7. ChickenDreamer

    ChickenDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern Ontario
    Quote:I will run it past the landlord before I do it, but generally my landlord is uninvolved in the house and it's upkeep. This was quite unfortunate when we needed a roof....it took several years to get it out of him. On the upside...I don't use buckets in my kitchen anymore when it rains!
     
  8. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Quote:If you were to go to a Kelly Moore or Sherwin Williams store that is where you will get the best help and a great paint for the $$$$. no Price does not equal quality, But when you use oil based paints you will have to practice lay down technics=brushing properly with a good quality brush ( Purdy enamel brush is good ), get a self leveling paint so there will be no brush strokes, do not brush too much, take the doors and drawers off then lay flat to paint, Paint edges and tight spots first then lay down your nice long frontal strokes, if you lay them flat the paint levels better.
    I hope some of this will be helpful.


    AL
     
  9. beak

    beak On vacation

    Dec 12, 2008
    Kiowa, Colorado
    To al6517

    What brand paint do you recommend for painting siding on a house. It's the standard fiber type siding they have been using for the past 20 years or so. The horizontal stuff. Not the concrete stuff. Currently has Sherwin Williams on it. House is 7 years old and trim is starting to flake. I've used Behr on my mothers house but coverage didn't seem that good.
     
  10. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Quote:I also hate using the Behr paint products, coverage was terrible. anyway it seems simple in your case just scrape any loose paint, and repaint with a good moderate quality paint ( exterior Latex ) would be fine, flat or semi gloss whatever you like. I personally use a commercial airless paint sprayer, but I paint alot if you know someone who will let you borrow theirs great. they lay down much more paint with better precision and so much faster and cleaner look, you may want to try that. You can even rent them cheap at any tool rental joint.

    AL
     

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