QUESTIONS on resting and brining after butchering

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by honeydoll, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. honeydoll

    honeydoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 14, 2009
    Stark County, NE Ohio
    I was wondering what you all do after the butchering. I let my last roo rest in ice cold salt water for two days and then in buttermilk overnight before I cooked him and some parts of the legs were still rubbery. So I'm sure I am making a mistake as I am still new to processing. Not sure what it could be. I would like a step by step of how long you rest the bird, and if you brine. THe roo I processed was a barred rock, 6 mos. old. I am getting ready to process 8 dominiques and want to get this right. I would like to try brining a chicken, and would love any recipes for brining a chicken. I need to know do you brine right before you cook or before you freeze? SORRY so many questions, like I said I am still new to this and tweaking my methods. I am a little frustrated over getting a rubbery result on our last butching, as a side note only the legs (my kids' favorite part) were rubbery. SO PLEASE HELP this novice become a pro. My family will thank you too!! So I need to know best time to let it rest, should it rest in ice water or salt water, then brine or just set in the fridge. UGH!! SOmebody straighten me out.
     
  2. the simple life

    the simple life Chillin' With My Peeps

    Maybe the roos was too old?
    I do the cornish and after processing I let them sit in the frig for a couple of days and then freeze them.
    The first ones I cooked I did side by side comparison with the brining.
    They were all tender and delicious, the only difference was the one that I didn't brine had the meat just falling off the bone so I haven't brined any since.
     
  3. Salt and Light

    Salt and Light Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2008
    Osteen, FL
    Personally, I think the brining and resting thing is over-rated. Just let them sit 24 hours then freeze...
     
  4. honeydoll

    honeydoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 14, 2009
    Stark County, NE Ohio
    Thanks. I would love to try brining and see. I've heard a lot of people like how it affects the meat. SO anymore help would be great. I was told by the lady at Ideal the dominiques should be butchered around 6 mos. Is this correct? I know there is no real written rule on this, but for a tender chicken that is good for more than stew should I butcher earlier? I would also love a good brine recipe to try, if anyone has one. My dominiques are now 18 weeks. Is this the best time to butcher and have a tender bird for frying and baking? Thanks for any help, I NEED IT!!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2009
  5. saddina

    saddina Internally Deranged

    May 2, 2009
    Desert, CA
    ok lil more info:

    1. are you used to grocery store chicken?
    - Grocery chicken are young cornish crosses that are often brined (contains up to 10% of a salt solution by weight)
    2. How exactly did you cook them?
    -time, temps, did you check with a meat thermomoter?
    3. Hertiage birds make more than soup, but they benifit from some different techniques, dishes like tamales, enchladas, pot pies and other slower, moister methods is where they really shine.
    4. Brine? water/salt ratio please. Anyadditional flavoring or seasonings?

    Older non-cornish chickens benifit from brining, especially when you're used to mass produced market birds.

    I'll dig out a pineapple teriaki maranade (differance between a brine and maranade is the maranades use acid and salt, a brine is just salt) if you'd like.
     
  6. todd walker

    todd walker Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 28, 2009
    E TX,Mabank
    You over brined, when I hunt(birds) we brine to get the blood out of the meat(where pellets for shotgun made holes) when eating a homegrown bird no blood holes to clean.
    But just got done cleaning ducks from this mornings hunt and they are going to the freezer,filled sink up to cover birds add salt to wond holes and 1tsp per bird let hem sit 2 hours drain and repeat 2-3 times untill water is clear,then drain in fridge,helps to dry them out faster.
     
  7. honeydoll

    honeydoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Stark County, NE Ohio
    Saddina: 1. Yes we are used to grocery store chickens. I did raise my first batch of meaties last summer, 6 cornishX and they were tender.

    2. Fried just like any, with coating -- it took a lot longer than I expected to get the right temp., checking with meat thermometer. The breasts were very good and tender and had a wonderful consistency and flavor, the thighs a little tougher, the drumsticks were parts rubbery.

    3. This is my first time rasing heritage so I know in order to cook meat well you need to "know the meat" and I have virtually no experience anything other than store or cornish
    X. I know it's just me needing to understand best methods of cooking them.

    4. Well for the salt water soak, how shall I say this, I put ice water to cover bird and a fair amount of salt. I didn't measure, I just put a good amount of kosher salt in the water.
    No other flavorings other than a overnight soak in buttermilk.

    Let the training begin!

    I would like the maranade recipe, that'd be nice.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2009
  8. honeydoll

    honeydoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 14, 2009
    Stark County, NE Ohio
    Just hoping somebody has a brine recipe. I see many for turkeys, is that ok to use? Probably is. Getting ready to process most of my roos today and really need advice on how to best brine dual purpose birds. I had a problem with rubbery drumsticks and need to know what I did wrong. Thanks. Hope someone can help me. I really want to give brining a try just to see what it's like.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2009
  9. jaku

    jaku Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I'd say either the roo was too old, or maybe you aren't used to home grown chicken? It will ALWAYS be much firmer than store bought, and takes a bit of getting used to.
     
  10. nancyoo

    nancyoo New Egg

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    I had a friend that let them sit on ice to rest but she had too much ice and it froze the birds. So if you do brine be sure that your water isn't so cold that the flesh can not relax.
     

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