Rabbit people help!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by TubbyChicken, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. TubbyChicken

    TubbyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
    Kentucky
    I just brought home my first rabbit last night. He's a 4 yr old, neuatered, Netherland Dwarf. He was extremely sweet when we first met, he was the calmest rabbit I've ever seen. He even rode home in my lap for 3 hours and made contented rabbit purrs while I petted him.

    I have limited experience with rabbits so a lot of this very new to me. I've read a book that explains some, but I have a few questions if those with rabbit experience wouldn't mind answering.

    I moved him for the time being, into a quiet part of the house where he can slowly start to feel a bit more secure with his surroundings. I was given, along with him lots of toys, treats, litter and food. However I've read that rabbits need constant access to hay and I don't think his former owner mentioned it at all...I assume TSC would have some, do I need to get some ASAP?

    He's also acting considerably different than he was last night. He even boxed my hand when I opened his cage to refill his feeder. I assume this is because he is feeling insecure and needing to adjust to his new surroundings. How should I handle him or react to him over the next few days to help him adjust?

    Thanks!
     
  2. EllyMae

    EllyMae Chillin' With My Peeps

    It sounds like he's a little nervous, which is to be expected. Just give him time to settle in. Yes, you need to give hay. A good quality horse hay is what I feed mine since I have horses. TSC does sell small bags of hay for rabbits which will be fine too. Timothy hay is great for adults.
     
  3. spookyevilone

    spookyevilone Crazy Quail Lady

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    Oct 5, 2008
    Minneapolis
    Hiya.
    As long as you're feeding him pellet food, you're giving him constant access to hay. Most rabbit pellets are made with timothy hay.

    You're right about the behaviour. Give him a few days of quiet and little contact or noise to let him adjust. He'll probably go back to being sweet. If not, start out handling him a little bit every day. You can also put a shirt or sock or something that you've worn in the cage with him to help get him used to your scent.

    -Spooky
     
  4. TubbyChicken

    TubbyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
    Kentucky
    Thank you for the replies! I wanted to give him some time to explore the house but preferred to wait until evening when I could supervise and the house would be a bit quieter, however, if he seems resistant to me picking him up should I wait until he hops toward me or should I just scoop him out, give him some lap time and treats and then let him explore?

    His former owner warned me that carrots, lettuce and other fresh treats upset his digestive system...and the food she was feeding appears to have seeds mixed in. I picked up some rabbit pellets (can't remember the brand...it starts with an "M") It doesn't look as interesting as what he's currently eating but it says it's produced without artificial ingredients. Should I still be offering hay with it?

    I'm having a hard time reading him, I hope with time that I can understand his body language a bit more. He seems pretty vocal for a rabbit. Would he be more comfortable in a different part of the house and would it overwhelm him to carry him to a different area when I wanted to give him some time out his cage? (I was hoping I could carry his litter box into the new room also and eventually have a few throughout the house).

    Thanks again!
     
  5. EllyMae

    EllyMae Chillin' With My Peeps

    you know, I guess it all comes down to personal preferences. I've had rabbits for many years and have done great with plain pellets(no other junk mixed in it) and I use Purina rabbit chow, timothy hay, and limited amounts of carrots, spinach. Plus apple tree branches that I break off of our trees. They LOVE to chew on these and they are safe for bun to have.
    The one time that I did have a sick bunny was when I decided to buy that "fancy" rabbit food with all other junk in it and my main doe got sick.
     

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