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Raccoons...

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by TubbyChicken, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. TubbyChicken

    TubbyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
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    We have a lot of raccoons here. They are very brazen and visit nightly. I had no idea they would try to eat and kill full grown hens. What special precautions should I take to coon proof my run and coop?
     
  2. Bi0sC0mp

    Bi0sC0mp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Raiford,FLA
    for coons you need hardware cloth bury it and secure it.. if you can get tin to put on the top of the run that will help alot also and keep them locked up at night in a secure coop with a locked door..
     
  3. Chicken_Lover4567

    Chicken_Lover4567 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2008
    Central Texas
    I agree with the above post, but make sure you locks are racoon proff. Ours are easy slide latches, but the holes for them are crooked so you have to really try hard to open it. That's how we racoon proff our doors....[​IMG]
     
  4. nautical_bouy

    nautical_bouy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2008
    Beaver PA
    Lock them up tight every night, or electric fence.
     
  5. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    We also doubled the locks on each door (run and coop); there is one up high and one lower. We figured that decreased the likelihood that any critter would successfully get them all opened.

    (It also discourages the kiddies from coming in without supervision.)
     
  6. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    May 11, 2008
    Howell Michigan
    Two effective methods I employed to predator proof my coop and runs is buried wire. #1- Buried wire mesh - Dig a trench 12" wide and 4" deep, bend the wire mesh to fit trench bottom and then up the side of you enclosure. Then backfill. This is more effective than running wire mesh straight down into trench. #2- Wrap entire enclosure with electric fence wire. Buy a fence charger from Tractor Supply, wire and insulators. The entire system can be installed for less than $75. I have watched coyotes and stray dogs approach the coop and then run off howling. It doesn't injure anything or anyone (knowledge gleened from contact with wire while painting), yet it teaches them to stay away. Some friends in my area have had repeated problems with skunks and raccoons while I haven't. So I know this works and is cheap insurance.
     
  7. TubbyChicken

    TubbyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
    Kentucky
    The electric fence is a great idea but I'm not sure I would take that route with a curious toddler who will be hanging by the run looking for the "chickies"...maybe when he gets a bit older, that really does sound like a great idea!
     
  8. nautical_bouy

    nautical_bouy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2008
    Beaver PA
    Just plug in at night, you shouldn't need it during the day.
     
  9. justpete

    justpete Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 7, 2008
    Southern NH
    You could put the charger on a timer for night use. Saves on the electricity also.
     

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