Raccoons

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Kdrandr, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. Kdrandr

    Kdrandr New Egg

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    Are raccoons a threat in the daytime? Im thinking about a lightweight run I can move around and that will protect them during the day from hawks and then they can be safe in the coop at night. I was thinking just regular chicken wire so it's cheaper but I know raccoons can reach through it.
    Thanks
    Kim
     
  2. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Yes, raccoons can be a threat in the day time. Last summer a mama with 4 babies killed my best broody, leaving 5 orphaned chicks. They are opportunists, not strictly nocturnal.
     
  3. Happy Dad

    Happy Dad Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Beware of racoons in the daytime. There is a good chance there is something wrong with them. Rabid coons will be active during the daytime. Dispose of them or call somebody who can.
     
  4. Kdrandr

    Kdrandr New Egg

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    I don't have my chickens yet. I have a coop with a little run space underneath and I want to build something for a bigger run. I'm having trouble deciding between a stationary coop that is easier to make predator proof and something I can move so they have fresh ground. I was going to go with stationary and let them out to free range in my back yard but I might have a problem with hawks. Any thoughts?
     
  5. Chickenrpoetry

    Chickenrpoetry Out Of The Brooder

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    I've seen raccoons during the day- one struck in broad daylight around noon.

    What I can suggest is that I use bungee cords to secure latches- sure, it takes an extra moment to get in, but it keeps the raccoons out. Also, using multiple types of latches help keep them out of your coop at night- apparently, they can undo simple latches, but if there are multiple types, they can't figure it out.

    It's been working for me pretty well- I have a stationary coop with a large run, so my hens stay in there unless I'm out with them, as hawks are frequent where I live.
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Chicken wire will not stop a coon. They will strike during the day, as well as at night. several years ago, I had Mama coon and 2 babies chase my car down the road, then they chased my neighbor into his house. That Mama wasn't right in the head for sure! During the day, I think a chicken would have better chances against a coon if she was free range instead of being cooped up in a tractor. At night: need to be secured in strong coop.
     
  7. Kdrandr

    Kdrandr New Egg

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    Is there really no way to predator proof the whole thing, run and coop? I was going to extend hardware cloth onto the ground for about a foot around the entire thing. I've been looking at the automatic doors but they are pricey. I work late a lot of nights so I can't always be there to shut them in the house.
     
  8. megalomaniac

    megalomaniac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    raccons will almost always attack/kill at night. They are very easy to trap in live traps with a small amount of cat food. I've never had one tear through chickenwire to get into a tractor, but I have had them reach through chickenwire and pull chickens toward themselves and kill the chicken and then pull bits of it through the wire to eat on. Dogproof racoon foothold traps also work very well to capture them and are quite inexpensive.

    I did, however, have a skunk that tore/ chew straight through chickenwire to get into a grow out pen two year ago and slaughtered 15 twelve week old pullets. He just ate the heads off all the pullets, and didn't even bother eating the bodies.
     
  9. megalomaniac

    megalomaniac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, and as far as predator proofing the run, I've found it's better to make a 90 degree bend in the welded wire and bury the bend about 4-6 inches underground with the 90 degree elbow coming out 8 inches or so from the upright wire. That way, a digging predator has to have enough sense to not try to dig under the wire where it meets the dirt, but rather start the hole 8-10 inches away from the fence and dig all the way under the elbow portion of wire.
     
  10. Kdrandr

    Kdrandr New Egg

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    Yuck! Gruesome
     

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