Racoon attack

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MCOBigBen, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. MCOBigBen

    MCOBigBen New Egg

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    We chased a raccoon off mid-attack last night. The chicken that got attacked was still alive, but is largely unresponsive and immobile.

    We've brought her inside, put her in a dog crate with a heat lamp, put Neosporin on what we could see of the wounds and have given her some water with electrolytes.

    It's difficult to tell what exactly the wound is, I'm guessing it's puncture wounds on the neck.

    She opens one eye, and tried to stir a bit when we put water in her beak, but other than that she doesn't move, and does not sit normally.

    How often should we give her water, and how much? Should we put some food in the cage just in case, or is it better that she not try to eat yet?

    Is the lack of movement a sign of a chicken that is 'on her way out', or is this normal chicken shock? It's been about 17 hours since the attack.
     
  2. SussexInSeattle

    SussexInSeattle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Geez, I'm far away from knowledgeable about this stuff but 17 hours seems a real long time. I'm surprised she hasn't gone one way or the other by now.

    The closest I have come to a similar situation was when two of my own dogs tag teamed one of my laying pullets. I found her laying in the grass with the two fools standing over her. I immeadiatly brought her in and ran a warm bath in my tub and floated her in the water, turning her around checking for blood in the water. It appeared that all the damage was maybe pouncing on her for fun rather than trying to eat her.

    I then towelled her off, blow dried what I could, then put more clean towels in a laundry basket, lay her in the basket and put the 'heat' button on my bathroom vent on to blow down from the ceiling on her, then shut the bathroom door and left her in peace.

    When I returned about 20 minutes later, she had laid an egg and a giant poo side by side but she was also standing up.

    I do not want to give you the wrong information but it doesn't sound good for her to be down for so long. I would definatly offer her food, if she attempts to eat, I would say give her more time but if she refuses, my guess is that she is going to have a long, slow death. If she were mine, I would offer treat food that I know that they love like cottage cheese, yogurt, warm spaghetti, fried or boiled eggs, something that you know on a normal basis she would not turn away from. Maybe even a little piece of bread with a dab of warm milk on it.

    BTW:welcome
     
  3. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    If she is drinking from the dropper keep dripping at beak until she stops swallowing (slowly in or over tip of beak as choking needs to be guarded against). Since she is swallowing you could add a small amount of sugar, mashed feed to water. The fluids are essential as dehydration will definitely kill her if the wounds don't.

    Very good luck to you, (and welcome)
     
  4. MCOBigBen

    MCOBigBen New Egg

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    Feb 8, 2009
    Thanks to you both.
     
  5. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    I once had a very injured roo who did not respond until Day 7. This was followed by a full recovery.

    If you can, asap put a drop or two of Rescue Remedy in fresh water for her twice daily (has calming effect and may help with shock). Keep her warm and as comfortable as possible with no stressors around (no loud noises, dogs or anything else she would find worrisome). If she has a best friend it may help to have the friend in with her for company at times. But watch closely to make sure the injured hen does not get attacked. I have a prince of a roo who was the most caring friend to my hen Ellie who was attacked by a neighbor's dog in December - she drew strength from him and did recover. Similarly, years prior when this roo was attacked in another location by a dog in that area (don't get me started on dog attacks = grrrr), his hen friend (RIP Betty) stayed by his side and he gained strength because of her and fullu recovered.

    She needs fluids more than food initially so try to keep her hydrated. This may mean ever so slowly dribbling drops along her beak line with a dropper so she can swallow on her own - I would do this with her upright. If she gets to where she will accept enticing foods with moisture (fruit, whatever) give her these things to prevent dehydration.

    If your bird has internal injuries she may need more aggressive care in the form of oral or injectible antibiotics.

    I am sending many many good wishes for her to rally and beat this.
    JJ
     
  6. MCOBigBen

    MCOBigBen New Egg

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    I have been giving her water by putting a syringe (sans needle of course) of water into her beak and slowly 'injecting'. She swallows, but I get the impression it's just to avoid drowning. How can I tell how much water I should be giving her and how often?

    I tried bread with milk. Over the course of a few hours she seems to have put her head near it, but hasn't eaten.

    She seems very reluctant, or unable to lift her head up. I can't really feed her "sitting up", as she isn't sitting, but rather laying on her side (which seems very ominous for a chicken).

    Thanks for all the suggestions, I really appreciate it.
     
  7. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    How many CC syringe? Try mashing up/liquifying a higher protein feed (maybe hardboiled egg/or mealworms) too add to water.

    Pesti and coworkers (1985) estimated the daily water consumption of broilers by multiplying the age of the bird in days by 0.2 ounces.

    For example, a 10-day old bird will drink about 2 ounces of water during a 24-hr period while a 60-day old bird will drink 12 ounces (or about 355 ml).

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/97/water-intake-a-good-measure-of-broiler-performance

    Not perfect, but will give some guidance.​
     
  8. MCOBigBen

    MCOBigBen New Egg

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    Wow, that's good info. I was under-hydrating her. All my previous experience is with dry Australian birds (cockatiels, etc), who drink much less.

    Thanks again.
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Your bird is in shock and needs proper electrolytes in her water (altho diluted pedialyte may suffice in a pinch it is imperative you get some proper electroytes and keep on hand for emergencies such as this or cold/heat stress situations). dribble it along her beak or do as Ivan3 says with the dropper (which is effective if she is sound enough to be able to suck the water from the dropper)...
    It is sooooo very easy for the bird to aspirate (this is where the water goes down the "wrong" hole > there are two>one leading to the airways/lungs) when giving water as you describe so I would be hesitant on that seeing as you describe her as being totally incapacitated at the moment.
    Raccoons , like cats, have a nasty bite (infection) and every vet article I have read says to start them on antibiotics for such a wound... a general one for bite wounds is amoxcicillin (preferably the clav potentiated).
    see here:
    http://dlhunicorn.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=practical&action=display&num=1158141893
    (dosage for the above is given in the AVIAN WOUND MANAGEMENT site article)
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009

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