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Raising 2nd batch

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by stumpff farm, Dec 27, 2011.

  1. stumpff farm

    stumpff farm New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2011
    I am now raising my 2nd batch of chickens and need some advise. In a few months the hens will be ready to lay and I am wondering if I should keep the "father" roo. Can he breed with the new hens even if he is their father? Will it cause any birth defects or disease prone chicks in the future? [​IMG]
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    That is a good question. The answer is that it will probably not cause problems. Practically all breeds were developed and practically all grand champion chickens are developed by inbreeding. That method has been used in backyard chicken flocks for thousands of years.

    The key is how good a rooster is he? If he has genetic defects or susceptibility to disease, he will pass that on to his offspring. If he is bred back to his daughters, any genetic weakness will be enhanced, but so will any genetic strengths. If you select your breeders with some care, you will probably be OK.

    I can't give you any guarantees but a whole lot of people on this forum do what you are talking about. Usually it works out OK.

    One problem is that you can lose genetic diversity over the generations. If you have several different roosters in the flock and several different hens, it is not that much of a problem for many generations. If you really know what to look for or follow certain techniques, like spiral breeding, it is not a huge problem. But for most of us with out skill levels, it is probably a good idea to bring in new blood every four or five generations. And, of course, watch the offspring. If you start to notice problems, don't wait to bring in new blood.
     
  3. stumpff farm

    stumpff farm New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2011
    Thank you so much for your advise. Still new at this but absolutely love my chickens!
     

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