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Raising babies in the Fall/Winter

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Chick_in_Indiana, Oct 25, 2008.

  1. Chick_in_Indiana

    Chick_in_Indiana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 14, 2007
    NE Indiana
    I just found a new mom w/ 5 babies the other day. I had no idea I even had a hen missing. Anyways they are less then a week old and it is already started getting cold. Down to the 30's at night. Will they make it thru the winter with just mom doing her job?

    Another question... I have a broody hen that is not giving up. Should I let her hatch babies this late in the year??
     
  2. katrinag

    katrinag Chillin' With My Peeps

    Do you have a draft free coop they can go in?
    I would just leave mommy to tend to the babies.
    I know there is a couple peeps on here who let there broodys have eggs. If it was me I would let her have them.
     
  3. Chick_in_Indiana

    Chick_in_Indiana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 14, 2007
    NE Indiana
    I do have a draft free coop but the door is open during the day for the other chickens, ducks, guineas, and pig to come and go. should I lock the mom and babies in a cage so she has to keep them in? I could put staw bales around the cage so it would be warmer.
     
  4. AK-Bird-brain

    AK-Bird-brain I gots Duckies!

    May 7, 2007
    Sterling, Alaska
    I would start thinking about adding a heat lamp. When the chicks are a few weeks old all 5 will be to big to be competely tucked under mom. Someone will be left with a cold bum sticking out.

    We let a banty hatch some chicks last November when the high temps were in the 20's (F) so it can be done this time of year but it is easier to brood them inside in a temperature controled environment (in my opinion) and gradually ween them to the colder temperatures.
     
  5. talkinboutmygirls

    talkinboutmygirls Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 4, 2008
    AK -
    Can you speak to how to gradually wean them to cold temps? I have 14 banty babies in brooder 2 weeks old. Not sure exactly how or when I should start to put them out. this is only my 2nd go round with chicks. The others were born in May and I spent a lot of time outdoors with them every day this summer. These bitty babies I'm just not sure about...
     
  6. Chick_in_Indiana

    Chick_in_Indiana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 14, 2007
    NE Indiana
    So what would be a good number of eggs to put under her? Too many and she wont be able to keep them warm when they hatch and get a little bigger. She is a mixed hen and not real big like a orp more like a leghorn.
     
  7. AK-Bird-brain

    AK-Bird-brain I gots Duckies!

    May 7, 2007
    Sterling, Alaska
    talkinboutmygirls - newly hatched should be at ~ 95 degrees (f) for the first week then the temp should be dropped about 5 degrees a week until they are on their own at what ever temperatures in a regular coop with the big girls. You can adjust your temperatures by changing the height your heat lamp is suspended at above the chicks, or using lower wattage bulbs , or a combination.

    Chick_in_Indiana - In my opinion any more than 1-2 chicks under each wing is going to out grow mom really quick if your not adding supplemental heat. Its tricky to find the correct ratio for each hen at this time of year. it also depends on the chicks. Banty babies are smaller so she might be able to cover them up better.
     
  8. crooked stripe

    crooked stripe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 14, 2008
    N.E Ohio- Suffield
    I have 6- 7 week olds that have moved into the coop at night with mom. Mom sits on 3 or so and the others squeeze in between the other chickens for warmth. No one seems to mind. I have even caught a chick sitting on moms back at night.
     

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