Raising Cornish Rocks on Bone and Ash

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Omniskies, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, so not -literally- bone and ash. I've been reading a book about growing your own feed for farm animals. In the chapter for poultry it recommends bone meal and powdered blood, among other things (the peanut meal looked promising). I'm wondering if anyone here has tried to make/grow their own broiler feed mix and how successful it has been for you.

    I already grow oats. What other feed would need to be tossed in if broilers were being fed freshly sprouted oats? Has anyone tried bone meal? Or peanut meal?

    Not growing our own feed is beginning to look crazy. Feed prices around here went up a couple dollars a bag within two weeks and will probably get worse before it gets better. We're really pushing to feed our own animals as much as possible without spending hundreds of thousands of dollars a day on a bag of scratch grain [​IMG]
     
  2. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I used to buy this stuff the feed mill called Pro-Peak.It was made of bone meal,blood meal,feather meal and a few other things.It was meant for raising the protein % in your feed.The grower mash I use is only 16% but by using Pro-Peak with my mash I could raise the % to 21-22%.It was great stuff.If a bird started showing leg weakness I would mix it like 50/50 and many times within a few days would be back on their feet.Because it is made from animal by-products I can no longer get it at the mill.(because of the mad cow scare)
    I have never grown my own feed just wanted to comment on the bone-blood meal. Will
     
  3. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can't remember the protein level of bone meal, but blood meal is supposed to contain 86%(ish?) protein. Bone meal might have been 50% or so. It's supposed to be added as a supplement to the feed, like the bag that you bought (they had something like a few tablespoons per 50-100lbs...ok, no quoting me. I can't remember the exact numbers). How much did you pay for the Pro-Peak?

    No one grows their own feed?
     
  4. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Actually the price of feed commodities has dropped like a rock in the last week, corn futures are down in teh $1.50 range and look to go lower as there is rain forecast in the heart of the corn belt. The condition of the corn and soybean crop continues to improve and the areas affected by the flooding in June are quickly replanting. The bulk of the commodity analysts that I read believe that we are not in danger of having any grain shortages and that prices will continue to drop.

    Jim
     
  5. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought my feed last week with not a single thing having less than a $0.50 increase. The scratch grain we bought was two dollars higher than the last time we bought some.

    If it goes down that'd be great. Since I'm in an area that had record breaking floods this year - almost every bleeding day for weeks - I'm skeptical that prices are going to go down a whole lot. Especially with gas prices happily poncing up to new records every other day.

    Admittedly, I'm saying all of this as a consumer without reading the reports you've been looking at. Until I go to the feed store and actually pay less for my feed instead of more each time I'm forced to remain suspicious.
     
  6. adoptedbyachicken

    adoptedbyachicken Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Prices never seem to go back down, why is that? I agree the commodity prices do, but not what we end users pay.

    Anyway I'm not growing my own feed, but I am trying to get it all local. I am buying corn, oats, barley, wheat and peas. I'm growing sunflowers and have the girls finding thier own greens for the summer, bedding them in green feed so they have that grain to peck at instead of eachother, and in the winter I'm giving them alfalfa hay too to keep the greens up.

    Buying local takes most of the gas cost out of it, makes it greener, and I pay way less.

    I'm using the peas, sunflowers and alfalfa to keep the protein up. The cals are good at finding their own bug protein too. Sadly free ranging I have had some coyote losses this year, next one I shoot I'm seriously thinking of feeding back to the girls! Protein!
     
  7. bills

    bills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you say bone meal, is this the same as the product that you buy to apply to garden plants? [​IMG]
     
  8. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It can be if it's 100% bone meal and hasn't been treated with anything that could be dangerous to your birds. I was looking at drying bones in the oven, putting them in a bag and running over them a few times with my car to see how well it works. I don't think it has to be a powder so long as it's small enough to be swallowed (oyster shell size).
     
  9. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    I give mine granulated bone meal on occassion (just the broilers). I don't even recall the protein % on the label (if any). It's for calcium/phosphorus boost. It's the same stuff we use to make organic fertilizer.

    I'm growing small grains here. As it stands, I do not mix it into a complete ration. I am just rolling the grain and giving it to them free choice, then putting out a metered ration of the compelte ration.

    If I had a mixer, though, it would be dead easy. I'd mix the rye and oats with seed meal (40% protein) of any kind to get the target protein. We have a custom loose mineral mix for our farm which is actually considered a feed pre-mix. So, I'd literally just have to combine the three things and you'd have your own complete ration with only having to buy-in the mineral and seed meal.

    There is also commercially available (and very very good quality) mineral pre-mixes made generically for swine, poultry, ruminants, etc. They come in 60 lb bags and it's 60 pounds per 2000 pounds of feed you make. I think they cost around $40-50 per bag.
     
  10. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I can't remember,but it was $$$ to me and came in like a 10 lb. bag like the bags used to hold peat moss. will
     

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