RAISING LAYERS

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by sinde, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. sinde

    sinde Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 14, 2014
    Kasane,Botswana
    hello there. can anyone tel me what recipe to giv my layers. am planning to bring in about 300 layers. honestly, i dont kno what makes them lay eggs. the reason am asking is that i dont want to use layers mash/pellets alone. i want to grind and mix with corn, sunflower and beans. wil i be reducing their production? Please help. hav already ordered and they are arriving in 25 days.

    thanking u in advance.
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    The closest I’ve been to Botswana is Lobito, Angola. Glad to see you on the forum!

    How old are they? There is a big difference in feeding chicks versus adult layers. Growing chicks should not eat Layer because it contains high levels of calcium that can harm growing chicks’ internal organs.

    What kind of beans are you thinking about? Uncooked dried beans contain a substance called lectin or phytohaemagglutinin that can in certain dosages harm chickens. I’d be cautious about adding dried beans.

    I don’t know what commercial chicken feeds are available to you in Botswana. It’s probably not that different from here, at least as far as the basics. Layer should have everything needed to give a laying chicken the nutrition it needs, calcium, protein, fats, fiber, amino acids, and other nutrients for a balanced diet. That’s mainly what chickens need to lay, a balanced diet with the right nutrients.

    Protein is probably the most important variable, though calcium is important. Layer should contain somewhere around 3.5% to 4.5% calcium, which is the right amount for a hen to make her shells. If you mix other things with the Layer or mix your own feed, you may need to supplement the calcium. A common practice is to offer oyster shell on the side.

    Layer should contain somewhere around 16% protein, though that can vary by manufacturers. Some are as high as 18% protein. Again, your mix should fall somewhere within this range. If the chicken does not get enough protein it won’t lay very well, plus protein controls egg size to a certain degree. The more protein the larger the egg. But larger eggs might cause more medical problems for the hens. Most commercial operations find the best cost-benefit level of protein to be around 16%.

    Does Botswana have a ministry of agriculture or some agency like that? They might have information of what is available for you.

    Good luck!
     
  3. sinde

    sinde Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 14, 2014
    Kasane,Botswana
    thank you very much for the info. yes we hav an agric ministry here. so my pullets gonna be at point of lay
     

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