raising meaties and layers together?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by txreddirtgirl, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. txreddirtgirl

    txreddirtgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 28, 2011
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    I'm ordering 10 cornish rocks and 5 americaunas (and i probably spelled it wrong!) from my 'local' hatchery. My question is can I stick them all together? Same brooder, same chick feed? I was going to separate when it was time to move to the coop, the girls going into the henhouse and yard with my layers and the meaties going into a tractor so they can "free range" and eat feed specifically designed for them. Any thoughts? suggestions? ideas?
     
  2. txreddirtgirl

    txreddirtgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 28, 2011
    Decatur, Tx
    no one answered on the raising chicks section.............thought I'd try my luck over here.
     
  3. Urban Chaos

    Urban Chaos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Austin
    well I hope SOMEONE answers - I'd like to know myself.
     
  4. Two Creeks Farm

    Two Creeks Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2011
    Hedgesville, WV
    Mine were raised with this years chicks, they even freeranged right along with the others.
     
  5. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    still have one living with all my layers. no probs here.
     
  6. oaklandmama

    oaklandmama Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 20, 2011
    Oakland, CA
    You might want to search the archives, I wondered this very same question and a lot don't recommend it. Meat birds tend to be way more messy, and get so big so fast that the layers kind of get trampled. I read others that did it, but since you're ordering double the number of meat birds than layers, seems like the layers will be really outnumbered. I'm far from expert though, try doing a search.
     
  7. remadl700

    remadl700 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As long as the food and water is available I have found it works fine. They eat non-stop. Incredible appetites!
     
  8. jadell

    jadell Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 20, 2008
    North Carolina
    As long as there's enough room, you'll be fine. If you want Cornish to slow down, give them a feed with less protein. This also helps with the leg problems, it just takes a little longer for them to reach market weight. I've got a few that hatched the same time my rangers showed up and they're all in one place together with some broody hens. I'll try to post a pic in a bit. Oh yeah, I'm feeding mine 18% crumbles and whatever they scratch up.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  9. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    That's the way I raised them. Everybody all together: laying hens, Cornish Cross, and ducks.

    But my birds have tons of space. A large safe coop with a secure run, and then they get out into the barnyard if there is someone going to be outside to watch over them.

    The Cornish finished a bit slower, were pretty good at scrounging plants and bugs, and the exercise was good for them. I had absolutely no problems with legs or hearts. I also had no problem with mess. They are dirty if they are confined to a small area. That's not the bird's fault. He's not the one that is supposed to be cleaning his cage.

    If you have Cornish X with smaller chickens the same age, be sure to have generous floor space and a lot of footage available at the feeders and water, so there is no crowding.
     
  10. Farmer_Dan

    Farmer_Dan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Seattle
    yes, raise them together. [​IMG]


    at about 3 weeks give or take, they may start hogging the food, etc, so you MAY want to separate them at that point, however, we had no issues raising up some layers with ours, we separated them about 2 weeks before slaugter and put the layers in the main coop while keeping the meaties in the tractor until d-day.
     

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