Raising roosters together with a good ration of hens

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ImNotYogi, Dec 22, 2014.

  1. ImNotYogi

    ImNotYogi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would this go over well? Im expecting chickens in the spring and with the margin of error with sexing Im expecting at least one roo. Therell be 16 chicks total. If I end up with two roos and barring any deaths, therell be 7 hens each. Has anyone ended up in this situation and just let them sort it out instead of culling/rehoming? I mean if there wasnt serious aggression involved. Maybe its a stupid question but Im trying to ask questions that come to mind. Ive only found threads concerning merging two existing flocks.
     
  2. HighStreetCoop

    HighStreetCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It really just depends on the roosters themselves. Some will get along (esp if raised together and NEVER separated), some won't.
     
  3. ImNotYogi

    ImNotYogi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ive ordered breeds described as docile but I know thats not a guarantee. Ive wondered how a "docile" rooster would deal with a threat though. Variables though.
     
  4. HighStreetCoop

    HighStreetCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Orpingtons roosters, which are usually considered a "docile" breed, are very good fockmasters. You'll find plenty of tales of them facing down hawks, dogs, raccoons, etc. on the loops devoted to them.
     
  5. ImNotYogi

    ImNotYogi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hopefully none of the (potential) boys will be tested but thats encouraging.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    It's one of those "try it and see how it works for your specific birds" things. I've raised roosters together and done fine, but sometimes I think I'm in the minority. Some folks have roosters fighting to the death...mine just posture some and there's some chasing and swquaking, but no blood or injury. How much space you have is going to be important, the more room they have the less they'll be on each other's nerves. Have a contingency plan for pulling one of the roosters in case things get nasty.
     
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    A lot will also depend on space, if you are the least bit crowded, more problems, more space, often times less problems.

    The other thing it sounds like you are a first time flock, so that all your birds will be the same age. Often times in this scenario, the roosters grow faster than the pullets, become interested before the pullets in sex, and can become very big bullies. In my experience, these roosters can become very aggressive as they do not have older roosters and hens to teach them manners. These roosters can be come very aggressive to people too.

    If you have young children, I would highly recommend that you not keep any roosters, children can be attacked first, and new owners often do not recognize aggression signs until it is after the attack. Roosters can go from just a sweetheart to a nightmare in a moment, and the more they are pets, they less fear they have of humans, this forum is full of nightmare stories.

    If I am asked for advice, I recommend just hens for a year or two, then get an older rooster. Then raise up a flock of chicks inside the flock.

    This is a marvelous hobby.

    Mrs K
     
  8. ImNotYogi

    ImNotYogi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didnt even consider when theyd hit sexual maturity. Obviously its a very good point to bring up. A former coworker of mine said he had to pin his roosters down because they tested him. I'll have to cross whichever bridge if I get a male.
     
  9. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    It's good you're looking forward to having roosters because you probably will turn up with at least one. If you have two, it may present you with plenty of challenges.

    I ended up with two accidental roos at the same time. They were a Brahma and a Cochin, two very docile breeds. However, as soon as this pair, who were growing up side by side, hit six months, they suddenly decided they needed to try to kill each other. So I spent all my time and energy and problem solving abilities in trying to keep them separated. The solution I finally ended up with involved one of them free-ranging while the other was penned, alternating days. On the day the Cochin had perimeter duty, a very irresponsible man came by with two large dogs that he allowed to run wild and they killed my rooster. Problem solved, but it tore my heart out.
     
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  10. ImNotYogi

    ImNotYogi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hopefully I'll only get one, if any. I dont want the hens to be stressed out or injured by him. But my yard is pretty big with an open layout. Theres just two big trees acting as a property line and 2 trees near the back. Looks like easy picking for a hawk. The breeds Im getting are heavier so ita doubtful that a hawk can carry one off but injuries and death are a possibility.
     

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