Re: Sheep?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by ChickNLittle, May 25, 2008.

  1. ChickNLittle

    ChickNLittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    1
    141
    Mar 22, 2008
    Folkston, Georgia
    I am looking for two small sheep. Can anyone tell me how much they usually are, and does anybody have any?
    Is it better to buy babies? If so, are they cheaper? Thanks so much!
     
  2. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    What are you planning to raise them for? Lots of people here have sheep, we just need to figure out what you're trying to accomplish.

    A ewe or wether at auction will run $100-150. A ewe with a lamb(s) at her feet $150-300. Bummer lambs (bottle lambs) at a young age may go for $30 at auction.
     
  3. ChickNLittle

    ChickNLittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    1
    141
    Mar 22, 2008
    Folkston, Georgia
    We just want two of them for pets basically. [​IMG] So I guess the $30.00 ones would be in our price range. Would be nice to have a male and female though. Two females would be fine as well.
     
  4. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    I would get lambs then for sure if you want them as pets. The issue is buying at auction, you never really know what you'll get. Buf, if you can find some bottle babies, then they will bond to you very well since you'll be bottle feeding them.

    Personally, you're overlooking the most beautiful aspect of lambs, though. They are made of meat! It's their best quality. [​IMG]
     
  5. snugglepup

    snugglepup Chillin' With My Peeps

    494
    2
    151
    Apr 15, 2007
    Creedmoor, NC
    I got my sheep free from a local herding trainer/instructor. She retires her older sheeps from herding when they become too tame to be instructive for the dogs. They are very pet-like and easy to work with. She could have sold them for meat, but would rather they go to a good home and be pets/lawnmowers. (Although if Fridge breaks into the chicken food again, he may be lambchops).
    I got real lucky. You might check around you for something like that. Can't hurt to ask!
     
  6. WrenAli

    WrenAli Chillin' With My Peeps

    190
    0
    129
    May 4, 2008
    Lebanon, OR
    Another thing to think about when getting sheep is type. As there are 2 types a sheep.. Wool sheep and hair sheep.

    Wool sheep you have to shear every year and sometimes it can be a pain to find someone to come out for just a few sheep.

    Hair sheep shed. It's great and they have better meat too.

    If you want them for pets I would recommend bottle lambs or just weaned lambs. They tame down a little quicker than a older, wilder sheep.
     
  7. ChickNLittle

    ChickNLittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    1
    141
    Mar 22, 2008
    Folkston, Georgia
    Thanks everyone. I guess I would be interested in the bottle fed babies, most likely hair sheep. If anyone hears of any cheap ones, let me know. There is an auction around here twice a month (about 50 miles away), but as everyone says; you never know what you are getting. [​IMG]
     
  8. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Honestly, shearing is not a deal breaker. I just don't like the hair sheep because of their builds and the way they put on weight. But if you're into it for pets, then that may not matter. I'm in it for good food, so there aren't any options in hair sheep for what I like to raise and sell. Good luck with your adventure!
     
  9. ChickNLittle

    ChickNLittle Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    1
    141
    Mar 22, 2008
    Folkston, Georgia
    Hey Grayfield, what do you use your sheep for, and do you have any photos you could post of a wool sheep and a hair sheep. That might help me make up my mind. When you shear the sheep, do you shear them all the way down? Thanks!
     
  10. WrenAli

    WrenAli Chillin' With My Peeps

    190
    0
    129
    May 4, 2008
    Lebanon, OR
    To me not having someone come out to shear is a big deal breaker. When the sheep are as big as me it can be an ordeal. Especially when you can do some serious damage to the sheep when using sheep shears.

    When you shear you take everything off.

    The hair sheep are a little slower growing but in my opinion produce a superior meat.

    Here are a couple of pics..

    Wool Sheep: The big one in the pic is of the Romney Ram we used to own. The coat he has is after a year of not being sheared. Suffolks wool grows a bit slower though.
    [​IMG]

    Hair Sheep: The ewe is a 2 year old Katahdin ewe with her second lamb of the year.
    [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by