Re-using a Coop That Had Lots of Cocci... Pics

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PepsNick, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Hey everyone. Over the holidays I'll be getting three more hens to go in this coop. It hasn't been used since June and two pullets died of cocci in it. Could the new hens still get too exposed to it in there, or should I not have to worry but keep some corid on hand just in case? If I need to worry, than how do I prevent it and could you give me some tips on keeping it dry? Thanks. Here it is.

    Main View
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    Side
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    The upper inside
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    The run (sorry you can't see the wire very well, the holes are one inch wide and three inches tall. We didn't have the run when they died of cocci, though.)
    [​IMG]

    All help is strongly appreciated. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Well, one of my chickens died of cocci and I just kept using the coop- and many others had the bloody poo too but survived. Coops still being used today!!!

    I always have Corid on hand now...it is so scary to think about needing it when the feed store is closed.

    Here is the best link on coccidiosis that I know of:
    http://www.attra.org/attra-pub/coccidiosis.html

    Hopefully someone will be able to answer your questions better! I just thought I would tell you those few things.
     
  3. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Quote:Thanks. Good to know, because after those died I actually housed a few more in there (they were 11 weeks so that was plenty of room) and none died. I'll get some corid before I get em'.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    You can sanitize it by spraying it with household ammonia (wear a mask!), letting it stand, then rinsing it out and letting it air dry. Ammonia will kill the oocycsts, but bleach won't. The ground is another story. You can lime it heavily, but then, it has to be rained into the ground or it can burn their feet (if it's hydrated lime, the best type to use for changing the pH of the ground). You can use agricultural lime, let it sit, then use a hose to water it into the ground or spade it in with a shovel. And yes, keep Corid on hand, just in case.
     
  5. PepsNick

    PepsNick Back to Business

    May 9, 2010
    Egglanta, GA
    Quote:Thanks Cyn! I'll do the ammonia.
     

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