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Really liquid poops.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by TripMomma, Feb 8, 2015.

  1. TripMomma

    TripMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've got someone in my brooder who has very runny poop...looks like watery mud to a sludgy mud in color and consistency. They are on Save A Chick electrolytes and probiotics, and have been for over a week. Their food is medicated chick starter, they are almost 2 weeks old. Is there anything I can give to help get these poops more normal?
     
  2. TripMomma

    TripMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Bump...anyone? Is there anything I can feed them that will help firm up the poop?
     
  3. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    It sounds like you're describing a cecal poop. If that's the case, its completely normal. Their purpose is to clean out the birds intestinal tract, and you'll continue to see them as long as you have them. They'll typically pass a bunch of normal poos and then a cecal.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Kadu

    Kadu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think every 8th poop is a cecal. =D
     
  5. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All that is true but you don't need to keep them on medicated feed and probiotic / electrolyte supplements. They are just living in a brooder yes? Clean water with maybe some ACV is fine. Probiotics live in their system after they've consumed them for a few days.

    This would be like if you were taking all those supplements and drank nothing but Gatorade and took medicine with every meal. Just not necessary and you need a chance to build up an immunity the same as the chicks.

    It does sounds like cecal poop but it could also be that the temperature is too high. This can cause diarrhea and pasty butt. Temp shouldn't be above 95ish degrees for chicken chicks.

    If you post pictures, you'll get a better idea from people.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    JJSS89 makes goodpoints.....
    ...clean water only from now on out....
    ...might be too hot, they drink more water then loose poops..and it can make them sick.....
    .......and a pic would help.
     
  7. TripMomma

    TripMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys. I will stop the Save A Chick stuff and may raise the light up more (their lamp is a red 250...about 2 feet above them...they are 2 weeks old). I will try to get a pic too.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2015
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    How big is your brooder and is it in the house? You may not need 250 watts.

    Is the light only on one end of the brooder so they can get out of the heat if they get too warm?

    A thermometer is a good tool for a beginner until you learn to gauge heat by chick behavior.



    Here's my notes on chick heat, hope something in there might help:
    They need to be pretty warm(~85F on the brooder floor right under the lamp) for the first day or two, especially if they have been shipped, until they get to eating, drinking and moving around well. But after that it's best to keep them as cool as possible for optimal feather growth and quicker integration to outside temps. A lot of chick illnesses are attributed to too warm of a brooder. I do think it's a good idea to use a thermometer on the floor of the brooder to check the temps, especially when new at brooding, later i still use it but more out of curiosity than need.

    The best indicator of heat levels is to watch their behavior:
    If they are huddled/piled up right under the lamp and cheeping very loudly, they are too cold.
    If they are spread out on the absolute edges of the brooder as far from the lamp as possible, panting and/or cheeping very loudly, they are too hot.
    If they sleep around the edge of the lamp calmly just next to each other and spend time running all around the brooder they are juuuust right!

    The lamp is best at one end of the brooder with food/water at the other cooler end of the brooder, so they can get away from the heat or be under it as needed. Wattage of 'heat' bulb depends on size of brooder and ambient temperature of room brooder is in. Regular incandescent bulbs can be used, you might not need a 'heat bulb'. You can get red colored incandescent bulbs at a reptile supply source. A dimmer extension cord is an excellent way to adjust the output of the bulb to change the heat without changing the height of the lamp.
     
  9. TripMomma

    TripMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are in the house, right now they are in our bonus room, it is probably 65 in there. We plan to move them to our garage in a week or so...it is not insulated so it is colder.

    The brooder is 3ft X 2ft ( I have 3 this same size, I'm guessing with 7 chicks I am going to have to split them up and utilize at least 2 brooders as they grow).

    The lamp is shinning down more on one side than the other, I just pointed it even more away...it is pretty warm in the room with 2 250 lamps going (I have 2 babies a week younger in a sep. brooder until they catch up size wise and we can try to get them together).

    I think you may be right and it is too warm in there, they do seem to drink a lot. I will keep an eye on them now that I pointed the light more away from them...I may still raise it another foot too.
     

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