1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

really need advice but, please don't preach

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dandydoodle, Oct 24, 2011.

  1. dandydoodle

    dandydoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2010
    georgia
    Okay, we have a chick that was born with a slipped tendon. I tried to fix it with no luck. Now it seems like the babies hip is out of joint and almost turned backwards. It is 6 weeks old but the size of a two to 3 week old chick. All the chicks it was born with are at least twice its size. They were trampling it so I separated it and bought two new baby chicks to go in with it yesterday to keep it company. The two day old chicks aren't that much smaller then it. It really can't get around. I have to put it in the very corner of the cage so it doesn't fall over so it can eat. I found it a couple of days ago shivering because, it had fell in the water bowl and half its body was soaked. It didn't drowned because, I have a new baby waterer in there so it won't drowned. When I go down there at night it seems to cry all night because, it can't get comfortable. I was scheduling an appointment to take it to the vet to see if they can fix it. It is gonna cost me about 65 dollars for the consult and whatever for anything else they decide to do. I wouldn't mind paying if they could fix it but, I am thinking I am gonna get in there and they are gonna tell me there is nothing they can do. Then tell me I can pay another 33 dollars to euthanize. If someone can't fix this babies leg its quality of life will be really poor. Its other siblings are moving out of the brooder and I just don't see anyway I will ever be able to let this chick live with the other chickens. It does okay with babies but, that is it. So what do you the chances are that this can be fixed? If this can't be fixed what is the most humane to euthanize. I am thinking I would rather my husband do it then pay around 100 dollars to let a vet do it. What is everyones thoughts I what I should do. Please don't preach though this is been hard for me and something I have struggled with for 6 weeks now and honestly the last thing I want to do is put it down but, I don't really know what other options I have. With 3 kids and a bunch of other animals I just don't think I will be able to raise a handicapped chicken. If anyone likes giving a home to these poor little babies please let me know and you can have her. I would like her to have a good home but, I just can't do it.

    Sorry this is so long but, if you have any advice I would really appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    MIchelle
     
  2. Woodcox Acre

    Woodcox Acre Out Of The Brooder

    63
    0
    29
    Sep 18, 2011
    A Mt. Valley in Utah
    My heart goes out to you, what a hard decision to make. But it does seem that the little one seems to really
    be suffering. That would break my heart. Maybe there are things worse than putting it down. Good Luck
     
  3. feathers_3

    feathers_3 Chillin' With My Peeps

    113
    2
    93
    May 18, 2011
    Eastern NC
    Sorry about your baby chick. I know we never like to put down our feathered friends, but sometimes it's better than it suffering. Good Luck!!
     
  4. TinyChickenLady

    TinyChickenLady Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have no personal experience but I can understand how you're feeling right now. I would think that a doc could easily fix that problem if he's experienced enough but I'm wondering about recovery time. Will you be able to care for the chick while it's healing? If you can, then I would say it has a good chance at a good life.
    Also, if it can't be fixed, I would agree that maybe your hubby could cull for you. I honestly don't get the point of being charged for euthanizing if it can be done at home where everyone is most comfortable. If that's the case, give the poor little bugger a huge last meal with all kinds of treats and holding and cuddling and then hand him off to DH. Bless that man's heart for being able to do what's best. My Dad has done it for me twice because I couldn't do it myself. Not to be gruesome, but I guess a neck breaking is the fastest way to take care of it [​IMG]
    I wish I could take the little guy off your hands but I also don't have the time to care for a handicapped baby right now [​IMG] I work full time and I'd be too afraid he wasn't eating right while I was at work.
    Good luck. I'll keep the little guy in my thoughts for you.
    By the way, does he have a name?
     
  5. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

    4,203
    73
    253
    Apr 19, 2009
    Oh dear. Just put the chick down. You're not doing it any favors, its suffering is being prolonged.

    How?

    Cut it's head off with sharp scissors.
    Break it's neck.
    Cut it's head off with a meat cleaver.
    Put it in a well-sealed container with a bowl of baking soda and vinegar.
    Shoot it if you have to.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2011
  6. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Get a pair of poultry scissors like you would use in the kitchen to cut up raw chicken, place them on its neck, close your eyes and cut. Done and done. It never feels good but it's the best thing for this poor, suffering chick.
     
  7. donnavee

    donnavee Chillin' With My Peeps

    759
    13
    151
    May 7, 2009
    Central NC
    I'm sorry you are going through this and you are obviously a very caring person to go to the effort you have to make this chick comfortable and loved. I'm no expert and I'm sure others can offer more sound advice, but I personally don't think the vet will be able to fix the problem and the best thing would be to humanely euthanize it. I've never had to do it and can't tell you the best method. People have various opinions on the best way to do it.

    It's a tough decision but if the little thing cries all night, that's hearbreaking too. Good luck.
     
  8. Cherstin

    Cherstin Chillin' With My Peeps

    227
    0
    109
    Jun 13, 2009
    North Port, FL
    When I've had to cull, I wet the chick down and tie it in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer. It passes out from hypothermia, then dies. It's very quick, from what I've read, but I still don't allow myself to open the freezer door for at least an hour.

    It's a tough decision, but I agree with the other posters in that it sounds like putting this one down is the kindest thing you can do. Pet ownership, even husbandry, is all about being responsible and making the best choices for your animals. No one ever said those choices were always the "easy" ones.

    I've always buried them in my yard and given them a proper goodbye. That has made me feel better after the fact. Good luck. [​IMG]
     
  9. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    When I've had to cull, I wet the chick down and tie it in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer

    Now, I'm a tough old bird and I've killed more animals than I could possibly begin to count....and this still seems a horrible solution to me. How long would you say that chick shivered and gasped for air before it finally passed out? Long enough, I would imagine. Why not an instant death compared to this method? Just curious.... [​IMG]
     
  10. Davian

    Davian Chillin' With My Peeps

    298
    3
    99
    Sep 8, 2010
    Vermont, USA
    Quote:Now, I'm a tough old bird and I've killed more animals than I could possibly begin to count....and this still seems a horrible solution to me. How long would you say that chick shivered and gasped for air before it finally passed out? Long enough, I would imagine. Why not an instant death compared to this method? Just curious.... [​IMG]

    I was thinking the same thing...it probably suffered horribly but you just didnt see it.

    Just use a cleaver/hatchet and decapitate. At least its instant.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by