Really need help, maggots are all over my rooster!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Atlas LaHaye, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. Atlas LaHaye

    Atlas LaHaye Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 19, 2010
    Hi
    Okay so I have posted that my rooster has had Botulism, and he is getting so much better as I have been treating him. Anyway, this morning when I went out to feed him he was covered in Maggots, so I put him in some warm water and got a lot of them off him, there are still a few I have not been able to get, and I am wondering if there is a way for me to get rid of them, besides just putting the poor boy in water. If anyone knows please help me out!


    Thank you
    Atlas
     
  2. chicks4kids

    chicks4kids Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2009
    Northern Indiana
    bump.........I am of no help, sorry.

    From what I just quickly googled, if any other birds or animal eat those maggots that are eating off of your roo (or the flies they turn into) you can be spreading avian botulism. I don't know ........

    hopefully someone else will chime in...........
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010
  3. lostsoulhelpmejebus

    lostsoulhelpmejebus Incubating Fool

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    Sep 23, 2008
    Roanoke, Illinois
    Quote:Maggot therapy
    Maggot therapy used in a small wound
    Main article: Maggot therapy

    Certain live maggots have been employed since antiquity as an economical, safe and effective type of wound debridement (cleaning). In controlled and sterile settings by licensed medical practitioners, maggot therapy introduces live, disinfected maggots into non-healing skin or soft wounds of a human or other animal. They eat the dead old tissue, leaving the live tissue alone. It is uncertain if maggot secretions have any effect on bacterial growth, since different studies have produced contradictory results,[1][2] and some species of bacteria may be naturally resistant to maggot secretions.[3] As of 2008, maggot therapy was being used in around 1,000 medical centers in Europe and over 800 medical centers in the United States.[4]
     
  4. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    I agree that maggots arent terrible but you really want to get them off .. Screwworm spray will kill any on the bird and also kill the eggs.. I would get some from the farm supply store spray well and then tommorow bath the bird... after that cover the wound with antibiotic ointment without pain meds...
     
  5. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane

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    Jun 10, 2010
    Michigan
    "disinfected maggots" being the key to why they're used in medicine. Flies and maggots outside can carry a lot of bad things. Keep your roo separated in a place more flies can't get to, and spray/bathe it like Coop said. Make sure you check it again after 3-4 days, to make sure there is not another infestation.
     
  6. Atlas LaHaye

    Atlas LaHaye Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 19, 2010
    Thank you so much for the help, I will get some spray and spray them on him.
     
  7. CoopCrazy

    CoopCrazy Brooder Boss

    Mar 3, 2009
    Columbus,IN
    Quote:Just be sure to do the follow up otherwise they will come back... One good thing about maggots is they eat dead flesh first so the skin underneath should be a nice healthy pink color ...
     
  8. Atlas LaHaye

    Atlas LaHaye Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 19, 2010
    Is there anyway I can keep the flies off him, I moved him away from where he was, cleaned his cage, and now flies are all over him again.
     
  9. feathersnuggles

    feathersnuggles Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 4, 2009
    Seattle
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010

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