Recent pet deaths, afraid more are on the way(EDIT: nvm, crisis over!)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lanimilbus, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. lanimilbus

    lanimilbus Out Of The Brooder

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    EDIT: After extensive research and sending away for tests, I've concluded that it was all really nothing more than coincidence. The lab confirmed it was *not* Pullorum or anything else. The two chicks that arrived in the mail died almost certainly due to stress from a delayed shipment, the one chicken that looked sick ended up recovering without any intervention on my part and the other chicken with the messy rear end that was behaving so strangely died but even after a necropsy nothing was found wrong and the rest of the chickens as well as the rest of my pets have all been fine in the 8 months since then.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  2. lanimilbus

    lanimilbus Out Of The Brooder

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    Another post after some more reading/thinking...does it sound like Marek's? I'm definitely hoping that it's not, but parts of it do sound likely.

    The two affected hens are among the oldest in the flock so that doesn't fit with the stuff I keep reading that says it usually occurs in young pullets prior to egg production. There are also two 15-week-old hens in the coop with the rest that are just as lively and healthy as ever, so you'd think if Marek's was the problem that they'd be the ones exhibiting symptoms. However, the always half-closed eyes sounds sort of like paralysis which makes me think Marek's; same with the laying down and closing of the eyes. They've been walking just fine though and I see no signs of paralysis in their legs. But it sounds like the most likely thing the quail might be responsible for, if anything. However I'm assuming Marek's would not be responsible for the two aquarium deaths even if it was airborne and transferred into the house...?

    I'm still worried that whatever it is is a result of one of the groups of birds (quail or new chicks) being in the area and infecting the others. If that was the case and it wasn't Marek's, what else could it be?

    Another question: is it possible to test a blood, feather or stool sample from the effected chickens by sending it to a lab and checking for sure what diseases they do or don't have? I don't know who I'd contact for this, if anyone, but it would certainly bring a lot of peace of mind knowing for sure if an infection was present or not.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2010
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Take a stool sample to a vet and have them do a fecal test for worms. Then you can go from there. Visually inspect them for lice/mites. Clean your chickens' rear ends up as best as you can after taking a stool sample to be tested.
     
  4. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would say that the frog & crayfish deaths are just a sad coincidence. There are very very very few diseases transmissable from reptiles to fowl....highly unlikely.

    Mareks....I may be wrong but doesn't sound like it.

    As to the chickens...this is what I found (below) in reference to the new chicks with white diarrhea.

    On the sick hens....is it extremely hot where you are? Heat stress??? They will stretch out this way on a cool patch of ground when hot...they are eating, drinking, & seem normal otherwise???

    If these symptoms look like what your chickens may have or if they develop white diarrhea, you must contact your state vet ASAP for testing.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Pullorum

    Synonyms: bacillary white diarrhea, BWD

    Species affected: Chickens and turkeys are most susceptible, although other species of birds can become infected. Pullorum has never been a problem in commercially grown game birds such as pheasant, chukar partridge and quail. Infection in mammals is rare.

    Clinical signs: Clinical signs including huddling, droopiness, diarrhea, weakness, pasted vent, gasping, and chalk-white feces, sometimes stained with green bile. Affected birds are unthrifty and stunted because they do not eat (see Table 3 ). Survivors become asymptomatic carriers with localized infection in the ovary.

    Transmission: Pullorum is spread primarily through the egg, from hen to chick. It can spread further by contaminated incubators, hatchers, chick boxes, houses, equipment, poultry by-product feedstuffs and carrier birds.

    Treatment: Treatment is for flock salvage only. Several sulfonamides, antibiotics, and antibacterials are effective in reducing mortality, but none eradicates the disease from the flock. Pullorum eradication is required by law . Eradication requires destroying the entire flock.

    Prevention: Pullorum outbreaks are handled, on an eradication basis, by state/federal regulatory agencies. As part of the National Poultry Improvement Program, breeder replacement flocks are tested before onset of production to assure pullorum-free status. This mandatory law includes chickens, turkeys, show birds, waterfowl, game birds, and guinea fowl. In Florida, a negative pullorum test or certification that the bird originated from a pullorum-free flock is required for admission for exhibit at shows and fairs. Such requirements have been beneficial in locating pullorum-infected flocks of hobby chickens.
     
  5. lanimilbus

    lanimilbus Out Of The Brooder

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    I took a stool sample to the vet which tested negative for both worms and Coccidiosis. I asked them if they thought it might be Marek's and they said it wasn't likely. So I'm not sure what it could be, but I did notice that the hen's eyes seemed more open today instead of half-closed.

    As for Pullorum...if that's what the three new chicks had, what are the chances that the rest of the chicks that were in the brooder with them have it as well? I'm concerned about the rest of them being asymptomatic carriers that would then infect and potentially kill the adult chickens once I put them outside with the rest of them.

    weakness, pasted vent, gasping, and chalk-white feces, sometimes stained with green bile

    The chicks did exhibit these symptoms...I didn't think of it as "gasping" at the time really, but they would close their eyes with their heads pointed up and kind of open and close their beaks like they were biting at the air. White and green were the two main colors of their feces and they were weak and would stumble and fall over often. I looked up Pullorum and most of what I've found talks about it just affecting young chicks and pullets or affecting chicks that are born from infected hens...but if the rest of the chicks do have it and are just asymptomatic, how likely is it that they would cause serious harm to the adult chickens they're in with or the quail in a separate coop? Also, can it be tested for? The rest of the chicks seem perfectly healthy and never exhibited any of the symptoms to begin with but I'm concerned they could still have it.​
     
  6. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You would have to test for pollorum. As the info says...if positive, the entire flock would have to be destroyed. Gamebirds (quail) are normally not affected.

    Get them tested, then you'll know what you're dealing with. Check with your vet as to where to start.
     
  7. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    I don't know what state you live in, but the first thing I would do would be to contact the State Vets office-a lot of states will test for Pulloram and Typhoid for free.
     
  8. jjthink

    jjthink Overrun With Chickens

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    So sad...so sorry for these losses and those ailing now.

    If you sadly do wake to another dead chicken, if you can get a necropsy done you may be able to get to the bottom of this and stop further deaths. If everyone's still alive and you are able to get one bird to the vet and find out what to do, then you can treat all. Sometimes it comes down to meds making all the difference. Quite awhile back I had a hen get incredibly lethargic and her poo was all wrong, in her case bright yellow. It happened pretty suddenly and she looked BAD - couldn't even hold her head up. It was Labor Day but after a bazillion calls I found a vet who would see her (for a premium! but that was okay because he went to the trouble of seeing her on a holiday). After examining her he decided to treat right away with antibiotic and blood work that came back later showed results consistent with serious infection and/or inflammation. I have little doubt she would have died without the meds but with them she came bouncing back and today is the picture of health. We never knew what hit her but we know what fixed her. This was nearly 2 years ago at this point. I hope very much that you can find out what to do to save the rest of your feather family there. Sending lots of good wishes. Keep us posted. Will check back.

    (In the meantime, if you can post all other possible clues - diet, their environment, what temps you have had there, etc etc etc - no detail too irrelevant - it will give folks more to go on...)

    [​IMG]
    JJ
     
  9. lanimilbus

    lanimilbus Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Would I have to get each of the chicks in the brooder tested individually, or just one? If one has (or had) it does that mean they all do? Or conversely, if one doesn't have it does that mean the rest of the chicks in there with that one are clean as well?

    As for medicine/antibiotics, I'm not sure where I would get them or what kind I should get. While my vet will do the tests, they've admitted that they don't know much about chickens so can't offer much help other than giving test results. I've contacted several other vets but none of them deal with chickens either. I called a specialized avian vet and even THEY didn't deal with chickens...just parrots and such, i guess. So it's been hard finding anyone in the area who I could call up and talk to, much less go and see.

    Quote:For the chicks, their diet is Blue Seal Chick Starter-AM Medicated Crumbles with the occasional treat of finely sliced hard boiled egg yolk, their environment is a brooder box with a red heat lamp, and the temperature in there has been around 80 degrees (started out at around 95)

    For the adults, their diet is Blue Seal Home Fresh Egg Maker Crumbles and grass and such when they're let out of the coop, their environment is a hen house with roosts, egg boxes, a feeder and a waterer and an outdoor coop with a roost and just dirt for the ground. It's been around 75 degrees here lately, some days getting up into the mid-80s or low 90s and some nights dipping down into the 40s or 50s.
     
  10. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    * Call any vet for the state agriculture vet's phone number...call them & tell them what you have. They'll tell you what will be done. They normally come to you & will test a sample ( sick chicks & seemingly healthy chicks). Once they have results, they will tell you what disease you're dealing with.

    * Don't worry about how to get antibiotics right now. GET TESTED FIRST & SOON. If it is something treatable, they will recommend what you need to do & recommend someone to get it from.

    * YES...if it is indeed pollorum....ALL CHICKS...even the seemingly healthy chicks...are considered infected.
     

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