Recovery period after being egg bound

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ccspin, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. ccspin

    ccspin Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    47
    Jun 13, 2014
    Hello! We have a 3 year old Barred Rock in our mixed flock of 9 hens. She showed symptoms of several possible ailments, but we decided she was most likely egg bound. We treated her with calcium supplementation, Epsom salt baths, and mineral oil in her vent. We had just made the decision to cull her tonight if she continued declining further. Happily, she just passed an intact (though poopy) egg after 24 hours of "spa treatments", so we are very happy with her progress! My question is about her recovery from this ordeal, as there's not much out there. Does she have special needs, as far as nutrition or treatment to her overtaxed body, as she recovers? Should we expect another egg right behind the first? Any signs of further trouble we should look out for? Is this likely to recur since it happened to her once? How can we avoid it in the future? Are there telltale signs of infection or internal damage to look out for? I ask because she is having trouble standing, despite brightening up quite a bit since the egg passed. Maybe it's just too soon for physical improvement, though... less than an hour. Thanks for any experience you can share!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,491
    2,596
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Watch to see that she is drinking well and has extra calcium available. If you have them offer some poultry vitamins in her water. You can also give her some chopped egg or tuna for extra protein in addition to her normal feed.

    She may have another egg developing/on the way, there is no way to know for sure at this point. If she doesn't improve, you may want to take her to a vet.


    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/07/chicken-egg-binding-causes-symptoms.html
     
  3. ccspin

    ccspin Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    47
    Jun 13, 2014
    Hey, thank you for your reply!

    Unfortunately, I'm doubting she'll rebound... she should have by now if she was truly egg bound in the first place, I think. She is consuming less food and water, and her poops are infrequent, smelly, and dark green (no blood or worms visible). She appears to be breathing calmly and clearly, is still alert, has a red comb and wattles (now shrinking from eating and drinking less), and is apparently in no pain... but definitely NOT improving. She is still totally unable to stand and appears unsteady.

    We will treat her as best we can at home until we're sure she's a lost cause. In case it's illness and not injury we'll get rid of her recent eggs and not eat her.

    Ugh, maybe she was never egg bound to begin with...its so hard to diagnose a chicken!! Inability to walk/stand could be anything from an un-contagious injury to her back or hips, to something virulent like Marek's... she has been separated from the others since we noticed her symptoms, so hopefully no one else in the flock will be affected if it IS virulent. We'll see.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2017
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,491
    2,596
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    It's possible that she may have an internal laying/reproductive disorder like Egg Yolk Peritonitis, Salpingitis, Ascites, cancer or tumors. Any of these can cause lameness/problems walking, going off feed, weight loss, loose droppings, etc. The green poop can be an indication of poor nutrition(not eating), bacterial infection or sometimes worms. Since she is going off feed, the poop would most likely be due to that.

    Unfortunately, if it is a repro/internal laying disorder the course of treatment is usually supportive care - sometimes antibiotics may give short term relief. Pushing fluids with vitamins, encouraging her to eat and giving her some TLC is about all that can be done.
    Marek's is a possibility. Symptoms can develop at any age. There's no way to know unless you have testing/necropsy performed. Given her age - 3yrs. - personally I would not suspect Marek's which is seen more in the 12 to 25 week old range.

    I'm sorry she is not improving. I know you are doing all you can [​IMG]
     
  5. ccspin

    ccspin Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    47
    Jun 13, 2014
    Thanks very much for your support! I am also doubting Marek's or worms because of her total lack of a "sick" look (and we have new layer chicks coming in 3 weeks, so of course I'm really hoping her symptoms don't appear in the other chickens, which would make it likely that it IS Mareks!). We are offering free-choice feed and water (which she does take in tiny amounts), and keeping her quietly indoors and clean when she poops. She seems content with that setup, not restless or anxious, so we'll let it go at that. I would think she can't survive long-term with so little moving, eating, and drinking. Thanks again!!
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,491
    2,596
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    You're Welcome[​IMG]

    I wish I had better answers. It sounds like you are doing all you can for her.

    Keep us posted.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. ccspin

    ccspin Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    47
    Jun 13, 2014
    Hello, there! Well, we gave it a week of TLC in the Chicken Spa and she showed absolutely no improvement. We had to cull her last night, and my husband gave her a viking funeral in case of disease. Thanks again for your advice!

    Another old hen is now acting slightly unwell...reduced feeding, not coming out of the coop. Otherwise no symptoms. Oh, dear... we're praying this is unrelated...
     
  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,491
    2,596
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    I'm sorry for your loss[​IMG]

    If you have a vet that can test some poop samples for worms, cocci or bacterial infection that would be a good idea. If your other older hen gets sick or has similar symptoms in a short period of time, then you may want to consider sending the body to your state lab for necropsy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2017
  9. ccspin

    ccspin Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    47
    Jun 13, 2014
    Thank you, Handy was a particularly endearing hen, and our kids were sad she didn't recover!

    There is a vet nearby who treats chickens, so we have the option to get poops from the unwell hen tested locally. In your experience is it better/faster/cheaper go with a local lab vs state lab? Do both kinds of labs test poops as well as perform necropsies?

    We resolved at the outset of this backyard project not to use a vet out of sentimentality, but diagnosing something via poops or a necropsy to safeguard the rest of the flock might be a cost worth paying.

    Thanks again for your time and advice!
     
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    9,491
    2,596
    366
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Your local vet should be able to perform the fecal float test on the poop sample.

    Depending on where you live most likely your state lab would be the cheapest for necropsy. Prices vary by state so I have provided you with the info I have for state labs - most have a necropsy price list somewhere in their web page, you have to sometimes dig for it. If you don't see one, give them a call. I've also included an independent lab link that a few people have recommended, this would be useful if you need to have something like a mucous sample tested to confirm and infectious respiratory illness.

    Most of us do try to treat at home the best we can. A vet and testing can rack of the $$$ in a hurry. But sometimes to rule out something contagious, it may be worth investigating.

    You are certainly welcome for the help, I wish you well.

    Necropsy and State labs
    http://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm
    http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/StateAnimalHealthOfficials.pdf
    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf

    Independent lab testing:
    http://www.zoologix.com/
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by