Red mite infestation!!! How to treat coop in subzero temps?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by accidentalchick, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    I lost a hen today, and admittedly I haven't been spending much time with my flock lately because it's just been so bitterly cold. We posted her tonight because I couldn't figure out what got her, and it was very clear within minutes that she had a bad red mite infestation.

    We wormed about the 1st of October with Valbazen. Can we go ahead and Ivomec them (in addition to sevin dust) this soon after Valbazen?

    Most importantly, any suggestions for treating the coop with temps that aren't getting above 10*F (if we're lucky) for the daily high? This is our first opportunity to deal with this lovely issue, but I understand the best course of treatment for the coop is to fog with Permetherin. Does fogging work in these temps? Mostly we're seeing subzero temps, so this is going to be even worse (on us) than it might otherwise be.
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Use sevin dust on your birds and in the coop, redust again in 7-10 days. Sevin dust wont freeze.
     
  3. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Just a pump sprayer works. Clean out all litter including the nests. Use an emulsified concentrate like Ravap or Permectrin II. Mix according to directions as a premise treatment and spray down the floors, roosts, nests,walls, cracks, and crevices. Let it dry and allow the birds back in the coop. If it is really cold sticking a powerful space heater will hasten the drying process. Like dawg stated, you can use Sevin to dust the birds instead of spraying/dipping them. Dusts don't work as a premise treatment because all mites have to do is find a crevice in the wood to hide in. Best of luck with the war on mites.
     
  4. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks to both of you for responding. We aren't even getting to 15*F tomorrow for our high, and that's without windchill (windchill has been in negative double digits lately). Sunday isn't much better.

    I found a suggestion for dusting the birds using an old tube sock filled with sevin in sort of a blotting or powder puff fashion (with a face mask of course). I think this might actually work pretty well for dusting the coop. I don't think I'll use this method on the birds as it seems like it might expose them to inhaling quite a bit of the dust, which can't be good for them.

    It's unfortunate that it so wickedly cold right now because I'd much rather spray the coop and be done with the nasty critters, but I just don't see how we can avoid turning the whole coop into an ice rink. Plus, it's going to be hard enough to keep the flock contained somewhere long enough to strip both sides of the coop, vacuum (we're thinking of vacuuming around the corners and exposed studs), dust and rebed without also having to try to wait for it to dry. In warmer weather, we'd boot them outside for the afternoon, but they aren't wanting to be outside any more than I am...Can't blame them for that. Wish us luck that we'll get a good enough dusting to get them the first round.

    Dawg, you've helped me on worming before I think...Do you think it's too early to hit them with a few drops of Ivomec under the wing (skin contact) if we just hit them with subcutaneous Valbazen in early October?
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
  5. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, and in 7-10 days when we redust, I assume we will also need to do the whole coop rigamarole again and not just the birds, or will the freezing temps help us out in that respect?
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Valbazen is NOT injected! It is given orally.
    If you're going to use ivermectin pour on, (not ivomec injectable) put 4 or 5 drops on bare skin on the back of the neck. It will quickly absorb through the skin...into the bloodstream and will kill the mites. Personally, I'd dust the birds one at a time by putting them in a grocery bag with sevin dust in it...shake and bake, then release them after dusting. Due to the freezing temps, I dont recommend liquid sprays, you want to keep the inside of the coop dry as possible.
    Get the chickens out of your coop. Put a pile of sevin dust at the entrance to the coop (a good sized handful)...then hit it full blast with a leaf blower. I guarantee you the dust will get in every nook and cranie. It'll take about 30 minutes for the dust to settle. Then you can let your birds back inside the coop if you wish.
    IF your mite infestation is SEVERE, I'd repeat the ivermectin pour on treatment in 10 days, redust coop in 10 days to kill mites hatched from eggs. Same with redusting birds if you decide to go this route.
    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
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  7. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Oops! You're right, Dawg! It's been a rough fall around here. We did Valbazen to worm and then ended up doing Tylan for a respiratory infection within a few weeks of each other. The Tylan was the injectable. Sorry for that confusion. Thank you for all your awesome suggestions though. We are totally going to try that. I wiped the shelves clean of sevin (considering it's off season for it) at the store last night, and I've got a friend with a bit more on standby if we need it. Cross your fingers that we get them asap.
     
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    X2. Carbaryl in Sevin is effective. Shake n' bake, lol. You and I don't have to contend with below 0 temps. That changes methods for sure. Those mites are tough little devils to exist in that environment.
     
  9. accidentalchick

    accidentalchick Out Of The Brooder

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    Truthfully, I'm shocked to have found mites as the problem given the weather we've been having. I'm still relatively new to poultry rearing, so I'm learning every day. It actually didn't even occur to me to check for them at this point (although I usually do during warmer months). Hubby and I opened up the hen that died thinking we'd find some sort of internal problem or that she'd just gotten too cold despite the coop's insulation. A few seconds after we opened her abdomen and chest, they swarmed toward the cavity presumably drawn by the blood. It was one of the most disgusting but amazing things I've ever seen. Mass migration right before your eyes, and she was a white hen, which made it all the more obvious.
     
  10. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Parasites all cause anemic conditions. It is a continual rebuilding process for the body to maintain the proper amount of red blood cells. Mites, worms, protozoa all rob the bird of vital nutrients which a chicken needs to manufacture red blood cells. So when chickens start showing signs of anemia (pale-faced, weakness), it is recommended to consider all conditions to be the source of problems. Improper diet is generally not a problem when well formulated rations are used as a staple diet, but should be paid attention to. So first, check for external parasites, treat for intestinal worms and coccidiosis, then supplement vitamins-minerals, and probiotics. I supplement water regularly with vitamins-minerals, and probiotics.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
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