Red Pyle Bantam......

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by kisses10, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. kisses10

    kisses10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2013
    i'm very new to the chicken world. I have a trio of red pyle bantams, and one of the hens have laid an egg, my question is, will she sit on her clutch during fall and winter months?
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Chickens will go broody any time of the year, they just tend to more in the spring and summer. She won't set on them unless she is broody, and just because she is laying eggs doesn't mean she will necessarily go broody right away. Bantams tend to be broody, but she could lay eggs for a month or more before deciding to go broody. If you want to have her hatch eggs, I usually collect the real eggs and put a couple of fake ones in the nest. The real eggs I mark by date and save a dozen (or whatever I want her to hatch), replacing the old eggs with the newest egg as she lays them. Then when she goes broody, I give her a day or two to be sure she will stick, and then give her her own eggs back.
     
  3. kisses10

    kisses10 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2013
    my red pyle bantam has laid some eggs, she hasnt yet started to sit on them, how long can the eggs sit out there without her sitting on them before i need to dispose of the eggs?
     
  4. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Hatch rate goes down after about ten days, some will still hatch after three or four weeks but a much lower percentage than if they were younger. It will depend on a number of things including the conditions in which they are stored (what is the weather like if they are in a nest outside) temperature, how hot or cold it is, the humidity etc, how good the eggs themselves are. As I mentioned before, if you want her to hatch eggs you can either mark them by date and take out old ones when she has laid whatever number you want her to brood, or put some fake eggs in her nest, collect the real eggs mark them with pencil by date and store them at 55-65* and 70% humidity if possible, when you have collected as many as you want her to set on, again just toss or use the old ones you replace with new ones.
    http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/...e-Cartwright-Incubating-and-hatching-eggs.pdf
    http://www2.ca.uky.edu/smallflocks/faq.html#Q18
     

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