Red sex-link hen or roo?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by suzanne_reed, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. suzanne_reed

    suzanne_reed Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    So I won a pair of hens...specifically laying hens just coming into their first lay. It was a Facebook contest from a new small farm in Scio, OR.

    So flash forward picked them up, it's been raining place was rainy, muddy, and they apologized that they were still getting the place set up, just moved in a year ago. I totally get that.

    I bathed the Deleware hen it was filthy and brown, came out white. But this red sex link ... I've never had the breed before but my gut says this is no hen. The only rooster I ever had was an auracana bantam that was rumpless. So my experience is very limited.

    It has a completely different body shape from my hens, and from the new Delaware hen.

    My trust in this farm is pretty low at this point. I had to treat both chickens for scaly leg mites that I discovered while bathing them. Contacted the farm and got an apologetic oh we noticed that on a bunch of our roosters... Hmmm I wouldn't send someone off with an infested hen especially if I was holding a contest to promote my new farm. I treated them and I could look past it BUT this "hen" is super aggressive and is doing that whole chest out rooster walk.

    Suspected shady dealings aside is this a roo?
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2014
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,964
    9,827
    766
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    That bird confuses me. Stance and body type SCREAM rooster, but the feathering is hen feathered, Frankly, I don't know, but my gut says that it is a rooster.
     
  3. suzanne_reed

    suzanne_reed Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon
    Hasn't crowed, but also hasn't laid an egg that I have seen. The Deleware has laid an egg.

    I'm concerned that instead of a red sex-link hen they passed me a RIR rooster.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2014
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

    31,452
    3,532
    538
    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    [​IMG]

    I'm also thinking it's a rooster. Not a true sex link, but a second generation bird so the sex is no longer linked to the color.

    It just amazed me what folks will sell or do as a promotion. I often think I overthink things like that when I'm planning on my own little chick business, but then I read things like this. Personally, I would be mortified to have a bird leave my place in less than good health. And to not be what I advertised it as....well, I live in a fairly small community and don't think I'd be in business long.
     
  5. suzanne_reed

    suzanne_reed Out Of The Brooder

    10
    0
    22
    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon
    I have a friend who wants to take the chicken. I have explained everything and they are going to take the chance.

    My girls aren't accepting this chicken and I am thinking it is a roo too. But my friend wants it either way. So we'll find out eventually I guess.
     
  6. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Either way this chicken is not a rhode island red.
     
  7. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

    5,698
    1,855
    361
    Mar 19, 2011
    NW Oregon
    x2 Definitely not a RIR roo...and I'm thinking 2nd generation red sexlink with strong possibility of roo. Some red sexlinks can be very aggressive as hens, and I'm seeing hen feathering, mostly, one photo gives the appearance of a darker saddle may be coming in. At any rate, it doesn't sound like a bird you want to keep.

    Many people breed a Red Sexlink to a Red Sexlink thinking they get color coded chicks, but it is the only first generation from the two full breed parents (a red based roo over a silver based female, commonly a New Hampshire/RIR over a White Rock/Delaware).

    Also, forgive my comment if unnecessary, but I would isolate these birds from your flock! Even though they have mingled, I would still isolate them just in case.

    You already know they have scaly mite from a less than pristine farm...remember it can take up to a month for disease to become apparent.

    They should be isolated, without flock contact, where you cannot track stuff from them and the wind can't carry stuff from them.

    I infected my flock with Infectious Bronchitis accepting a bird I had a gut feeling I shouldn't...I thought I had the bird in isolation, but the wind carried the virus across the yard...plus my birds were able to free range over to that area before we put up the separating fence.

    Sorry for your bad experience.

    Lady of McCamley
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2014

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by