Red sexlink question.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Chris Herzog, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. Chris Herzog

    Chris Herzog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If a New Hampshire roo over a Light Sussex hen will give you a Red Sexlink chick, is the same true for a New Hampshire roo over a Columbian Wyandotte hen? I have tried searching for this on here and on the internet but I'm getting lost in all the different variations and gene info offered. I have a NH roo and I have a few Columbian Wyandotte pullets, if I were to breed them down the road will I get Red Sexlink chicks?

    Thanks in advance,

    Chris
     
  2. Little One

    Little One Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Nov 9, 2011
  3. Chris Herzog

    Chris Herzog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yea I was looking at that thread earlier and it's a little deep for me but what I think I'm getting out of it is this. If I breed a New Hampshire roo with a Columbian Wyandotte I will get this...
    [​IMG]

    Am I following this chart correctly?

    [​IMG]
    2. Crossing a Group 1 male with any Group 2A or 2B female produces the effective expression of gold or silver in the offspring. This cross produces chicks with a pseudo-wild type down with gold or silver expression in the non-striped areas of the down. See Illustration 2

    The pic above is Illustration 2

    Let me know...

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  4. Little One

    Little One Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's what I got out of reading the chart, also. Good luck if you decide to breed them!
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Yes you will get red sex link chicks with that combination. I don't know exactly what the chicks will look like as far as other colors and patterns, but the males will be yellowish and the females reddish. We are talking down color, not feather color, so this works best with just hatched chicks. There is a correlation with down color and feather color, but I've had some strange colors show up as the chick feathers out. With my mutts, some chicks feather out quite a bit differently than you would expect by looking at the down.

    With some crosses, the difference is real obvious. The males are clearly yellow and the females are clearly red. With some crosses, like when you use a Buff Orp male over some silver hens, the difference is not as clear as you would think. It really helps in those cases to have both males and females in the hatch so you can compare one to the other.

    I don't have any experience with New Hampshires. I think they are lighter than some of the dark red birds, so you may need to have some males and females chicks to compare to each other, especially your first time, but I'd think the difference will be pretty obvious when you see them together.

    One word of warning. This works best if you don't have any other red or yellow chicks from other breeds in the hatch. You might be able to tell by striping or something like that, but it is real easy to get confused which are which if you have other red or yellow chicks in the hatch, especially your first time.
     
  6. Chris Herzog

    Chris Herzog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys for the help and the info. It's going to be a while but I do plan on doing this when the chicks are older.

    Chris
     

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